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Energy and greenhouse gas emissions implications of alternative housing types for Australia

Crawford, Robert and Fuller, Robert 2011, Energy and greenhouse gas emissions implications of alternative housing types for Australia, in Proceedings of the State of Australian Cities National Conference, [Australian Sustainable Cities and Regions Network (ASCRN)], [Melbourne, Vic.], pp. 1-12.

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Title Energy and greenhouse gas emissions implications of alternative housing types for Australia
Author(s) Crawford, Robert
Fuller, Robert
Conference name State of Australian Cities. Conference (2011 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 29 Nov. - 2 Dec. 2011
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the State of Australian Cities National Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2011
Conference series State of Australian Cities National Conference
Start page 1
End page 12
Publisher [Australian Sustainable Cities and Regions Network (ASCRN)]
Place of publication [Melbourne, Vic.]
Keyword(s) greenhouse gas emissions
house size, style and location
urban growth
Summary Many cities around the world are looking for ways to reduce their per capita greenhouse gas emissions. The outward growth of cities from a central business district, typical of many cities around the world, is often seen as working against this goal and as unsustainable. This is especially the case in circumstances where this growth is not supported by the necessary infrastructure, often resulting in an increase in the use of private transport. However, alternative scenarios to contain the outward growth are being proposed. This paper provides a comparison of the energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions between typical detached outer-suburban housing currently being built in Australia's major cities and inner-city and -suburban apartments, which are increasingly seen as a legitimate alternative to the housing that is currently being built on our outer city fringes. By analysing the energy demand associated with the construction and operation of each housing type and for occupant travel it was found that the location of the housing and its size are the dominant factors determining energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The findings from this analysis provide useful information for policy-makers in planning the development of our cities into the future, when faced with a growing population and an increasing need to minimise greenhouse gas emissions.
ISBN 9780646568058
Language eng
Field of Research 120507 Urban Analysis and Development
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042312

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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