Islamic gardens between restoration and replacement

Kenawy, Inji 2011, Islamic gardens between restoration and replacement, in AASA 2011 : Proceedings of the 6th International Conference of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia : Architecture @ the Edge, Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building, Geelong, Vic., pp. 144-152.

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Title Islamic gardens between restoration and replacement
Author(s) Kenawy, Inji
Conference name Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia International Conference : Architecture @ the Edge (2011 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Vic.
Conference dates 18-21 Sep. 2011
Title of proceedings AASA 2011 : Proceedings of the 6th International Conference of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia : Architecture @ the Edge
Editor(s) Elkadi, Hisham
Xu, Leilei
Coulson, James
Publication date 2011
Conference series Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia International Conference : Architecture @ the Edge
Start page 144
End page 152
Publisher Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Keyword(s) architecture
architectural heritage
Islamic period
landscape architecture
Summary Architecture is considered the visible reflection of the local character of contexts. Therefore, conserving the architectural heritage is becoming one of the critical concepts in life, especially with the rapid change and transformation characterizing the globalization era. As a vital part of the broader context of the architecture; landscape architecture is also considered an effective tool of societies’ self representation. Gardens reflect a very special relationship between the man and nature and represent the history of the state of societies in which they were developed. Islamic gardens are one of the historic gardens having a special charm of their own. Gardens associated with Islamic period over several hundred years, are designed according to certain ideological principles employing certain physical elements shown in the west as well as the east. They represent an ideological continuity which is unique in its spread and development over a wide range of geographical and cultural regions. The Islamic architectural heritage is usually well protected. In the restoration process, the historic buildings are returned back to their original conditions. However, with the changing nature of gardens; it is sometimes hard to track back their original state. In that case, in order to conserve those gardens; it is important to study the design principles upon which the physical elements were chosen. In this paper, the principles of design of the original Islamic gardens will be reviewed through a quantitative analysis of a questionnaire. These principles will be compared to the current situation of the garden of Humayun’s Tomb built in the Mughal era in India, after its conservation in 2003.
ISBN 9780958192552
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2011, Inji Kenawy
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042322

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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