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Optimising the life cycle energy performance of residential buildings

Crawford, Robert H., Czerniakowski, Isabella and Fuller, Robert J. 2011, Optimising the life cycle energy performance of residential buildings, in ANZAScA 2011 : From principles to practice in architectural science: Proceedings of the 45th Annual conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association, ANZAScA, Sydney, N. S. W., pp. 1-8.

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Title Optimising the life cycle energy performance of residential buildings
Author(s) Crawford, Robert H.
Czerniakowski, Isabella
Fuller, Robert J.
Conference name Architectural Science Association. Conference (45th : 2011 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N. S. W.
Conference dates 17-19 Nov. 2011
Title of proceedings ANZAScA 2011 : From principles to practice in architectural science: Proceedings of the 45th Annual conference of the Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association
Editor(s) Hyde, R.
Hayman, S.
Cabrera, D.
Publication date 2011
Conference series Architectural Science Association. Conference
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher ANZAScA
Place of publication Sydney, N. S. W.
Keyword(s) residential buildings
life cycle energy
embodied energy
thermal simulation
Summary A holistic approach to low-energy building design is essential to ensure that any efficiency improvement strategies provide a net energy benefit over the life of the building. Previous work by the authors has established a model for informing low-energy building design based on a comparison of the life cycle energy demand associated with a broad range of building assemblies. This model ranks assemblies based on their combined initial and recurrent embodied energy and operational energy demand. The current study applies this model to an actual residential building in order to demonstrate the application of the model for optimising a building’s life cycle energy performance. The aim of this study was to demonstrate how the availability of comparable energy performance information at the building design stage can be used to better optimise a building’s energy performance. The life cycle energy demand of the case study building, located in the temperate climate of Melbourne, Australia, was quantified using a comprehensive embodied energy assessment technique and TRNSYS thermal energy simulation software. The building was then modelled with variations to its external assemblies in an attempt to optimise its life cycle energy performance. The alternative assemblies chosen were those shown through the author’s previous modelling to result in the lowest life cycle energy demand for each building element. The best performing assemblies for each of the main external building elements were then combined into a best-case scenario to quantify the potential life cycle energy savings possible compared to the original building. The study showed that significant life cycle energy savings are possible through the modelling of individual building elements for the case study building. While these findings relate to a very specific case, this study demonstrates the application of a model for optimising building life cycle energy performance that may be applied more broadly during early-stage building design to optimise life cycle energy performance.
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ISBN 9780958122139
Language eng
Field of Research 120507 Urban Analysis and Development
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2011, ANZAScA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042335

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.