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The outward gaze and the inward gaze : houses of Italian and Chinese migrants in Melbourne

Levin, Iris 2011, The outward gaze and the inward gaze : houses of Italian and Chinese migrants in Melbourne, in Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia, Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building, Geelong, Vic., pp. 375-385.

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Title The outward gaze and the inward gaze : houses of Italian and Chinese migrants in Melbourne
Author(s) Levin, Iris
Conference name Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia International Conference : Architecture @ the Edge (2011 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Vic.
Conference dates 18-21 Sep. 2011
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia
Editor(s) Elkadi, Hisham
Xu, Leilei
Coulson, James
Publication date 2011
Conference series Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia International Conference : Architecture @ the Edge
Start page 375
End page 385
Publisher Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Keyword(s) architetural form
outward gaze
inward gaze
Summary Not much has been said on the role of the architectural form of housing in the process of migrants’ settlement in the literature. This paper looks at this question through an exploration of the ‘outward gaze’ against the ‘inward gaze’. The outward gaze allows the investigation of exteriors of houses - assumed to be of Italian migrants - by looking at them only from the street, while the ‘inward gaze’ allows the investigation of the interiors of the house as well. In addition to housing exteriors explored in the streets of Melbourne, one Chinese migrant house was examined first through the outward gaze, as seen from the outside of the house by passer-bys, and then by the inward gaze, as seen only by household members and their guests. It is argued that ethnic representations described in the literature are only the visible side of the story, and that there is a lot more that is hidden from the public eye that can be exposed only by the inward gaze. Nevertheless, these unseen representations are vital to the settlement process and are often crucial to its success.
ISBN 9780958192552
Language eng
Field of Research 120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservation
200208 Migrant Cultural Studies
200209 Multicultural, Intercultural and Cross-cultural Studies
Socio Economic Objective 950399 Heritage not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2011, Iris Levin
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042355

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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