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The water harvesting landscape of Budj Bim and Lake Condah : whither world heritage recognition

Jones, David 2011, The water harvesting landscape of Budj Bim and Lake Condah : whither world heritage recognition, in Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia, Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building, Geelong, Vic., pp. 131-142.

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Title The water harvesting landscape of Budj Bim and Lake Condah : whither world heritage recognition
Author(s) Jones, David
Conference name Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia International Conference : Architecture @ the Edge (2011 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Vic.
Conference dates 18-21 Sep. 2011
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia
Editor(s) Elkadi, Hisham
Xu, Leilei
Coulson, James
Publication date 2011
Conference series Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia International Conference : Architecture @ the Edge
Start page 131
End page 142
Total pages 12
Publisher Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Keyword(s) Lake Condah
environmental planning
world heritage
indigenous systems
Gunditjmara
Budj Bim
Summary In July 2004 the Budj Bim National Heritage Landscape was inscribed onto the National Heritage List. The place accorded with the criterion of A. Events, Processes (in demonstrating a place of Indigenous-European colonization conflict), B. Rarity (in demonstrating the context, historical and philosophy of benevolence of Governments to Indigenous people), F. Creative or technical achievement (in demonstrating technical accomplishment in construction the system), and, I. Indigenous tradition (in demonstrating longevity and continuity of cultural practices). Such affords Budj Bim, that hosts a unique Indigenous water harvesting and aquaculture infrastructure system dating some 7,000-10,000 years within a country that the Gunditjmara have managed for some 20,000-50,000 years, national standing. Within the lands gazetted is a complex and multi-faceted system that would today be categorised as a major integrated landscape planning and catchment management scheme that includes demonstrable major site engineering, hydraulic engineering, and aquaculture and water management scientific evidence and process knowledge and application.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9780958192552
Language eng
Field of Research 120599 Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 950302 Conserving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2011, David Jones
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042357

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.