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Thermal comfort adaptation in outdoor places

Kenawy, Inji and Elkadi, Hisham 2011, Thermal comfort adaptation in outdoor places, in Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia, Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building, Geelong, Vic., pp. 215-224.

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Title Thermal comfort adaptation in outdoor places
Author(s) Kenawy, Inji
Elkadi, Hisham
Conference name Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia International Conference : Architecture @ the Edge (2011 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Vic.
Conference dates 18-21 Sep. 2011
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference of the Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia
Editor(s) Elkadi, Hisham
Xu, Leilei
Coulson, James
Publication date 2011
Conference series Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia International Conference : Architecture @ the Edge
Start page 215
End page 224
Publisher Deakin University, School of Architecture & Building
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Keyword(s) thermal comfort
outdoor places
thermal adaptation
cultural diversity
Summary The level of international migration has been growing in the last decades creating a plurality of cultures and inspiring a multicultural nature in global cities (O'Byrne, 1997; Short and Kim, 1999; Hawkins, 2006). This created new challenges in urban planning or the management of the coexistence of different people that are having different characteristics shaping their unique identity and needs in shared places. Being the urban stages where the social interactions happen, public places are considered important parts of cities (Thompson, 2002; Varna, 2009). These places can contribute to enhance the quality of life within cities, or contrarily increase isolation and social exclusion (Lo et al.; 2003). As agreed by researchers the users’ state of comfort gives a good indication for how successful is the public outdoor places (Rosheidat et al.; 2008; Kwong et al.; 2009; Aljawabra and Nikolopoulou, 2010). In order to create a successful open space usable by all members of a community, urban designers need to satisfy their thermal comfort needs in its wider meaning according to a variety of users (Knez and Thorsson, 2006; Thorsson et al.; 2007). While assessing the thermal comfort, in addition to the strong influence of the microclimatic parameters, the term thermal adaptation seems to becoming increasingly important. The thermal comfort adaption is then a considerable issue in design guidelines of outdoor environments (Nikolopoulou and Steemers, 2003). The main aim of the research is to examine the influence of thermal adaptation and environmental attitude on participants’ thermal requirements in outdoor public places. It focuses on understanding the effect of adaptation on the thermal comfort perception of immigrants. The research methodology of the research is provided through quantitative analysis of a case study. The findings of thermal comfort investigations could be applied into improving the quality of urban areas in order to increase the outdoor activities of citizens and use of outdoor places.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9780958192552
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2011, Inji Kenawy and Hisham Elkadi
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042360

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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