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Characteristics of utility cyclists in Queensland, Australia : an examination of the associations between individual, social and environmental factors and utility cycling

Sahlqvist, Shannon L. and Heesch, Kristiann C. 2012, Characteristics of utility cyclists in Queensland, Australia : an examination of the associations between individual, social and environmental factors and utility cycling, Journal of physical activity and health, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 818-828.

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Title Characteristics of utility cyclists in Queensland, Australia : an examination of the associations between individual, social and environmental factors and utility cycling
Author(s) Sahlqvist, Shannon L.ORCID iD for Sahlqvist, Shannon L. orcid.org/0000-0002-3714-9533
Heesch, Kristiann C.
Journal name Journal of physical activity and health
Volume number 9
Issue number 6
Start page 818
End page 828
Total pages 11
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Keyword(s) transport
physical activity
correlates
Summary Background: Initiatives to promote utility cycling in countries like Australia and the US, which have low rates of utility cycling, may be more effective if they first target recreational cyclists. This study aimed to describe patterns of utility cycling and examine its correlates, among cyclists in Queensland, Australia.

Methods
: An online survey was administered to adult members of a state-based cycling community and advocacy group (n=1813). The survey asked about demographic characteristics and cycling behavior, motivators and constraints. Utility cycling patterns were described, and logistic regression modeling was used to examine associations between utility cycling and other variables.

Results
: Forty-seven percent of respondents reported utility cycling: most did so to commute (86%). Most journeys (83%) were >5 km. Being male, younger, employed full-time, or university-educated increased the likelihood of utility cycling (p<0.05). Perceiving cycling to be a cheap or a convenient form of transport were associated with utility cycling (p<0.05).

Conclusions
: The moderate rate of utility cycling among recreational cyclists highlights a potential to promote utility cycling among this group. To increase utility cycling, strategies should target female and older recreational cyclists and focus on making cycling a cheap and convenient mode of transport.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Human Kinetics
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042648

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Created: Fri, 24 Feb 2012, 07:42:49 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.