Fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of proximal colon, distal colon and rectal cancers in a case-control study in Western Australia

Annema, Neeltje, Heyworth, Jane S., McNaughton, Sarah A., Iacopetta, Barry and Fritschi, Lin 2011, Fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of proximal colon, distal colon and rectal cancers in a case-control study in Western Australia, Journal of the American dietetic association, vol. 111, no. 10, pp. 1479-1490.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of proximal colon, distal colon and rectal cancers in a case-control study in Western Australia
Author(s) Annema, Neeltje
Heyworth, Jane S.
McNaughton, Sarah A.
Iacopetta, Barry
Fritschi, Lin
Journal name Journal of the American dietetic association
Volume number 111
Issue number 10
Start page 1479
End page 1490
Total pages 12
Publisher Elsevier Inc.
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2011-10
ISSN 0002-8223
1878-3570
Summary Background Fruits and vegetables (F/V) have been examined extensively in nutrition research in relation to colorectal cancer (CRC). However, their protective effect is subject to debate, possibly because of different effects on different subsites of the large bowel.

Objective To determine whether any association between F/V consumption and risk of CRC differed by subsite of the bowel (proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum).

Design The Western Australian Bowel Health Study is a population-based, case-control study conducted between June 2005 and August 2007. Complete food frequency questionnaire data were analysed from 834 CRC cases and 939 controls. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the effects of quartiles of F/V intake on risk of CRC at different subsites. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for CRC overall and for the three separate subsites.

Results Risk of proximal colon cancer and rectal cancer was not associated with intakes of total F/V, total vegetable, or total fruit. Brassica vegetable intake was inversely related with proximal colon cancer (Q4 vs Q1 OR 0.62; 95% CI 0.41 to 0.93). For distal colon cancer, significant negative trends were seen for total F/V, and total vegetable intake. Distal colon cancer risk was significantly decreased for intake of dark yellow vegetables (Q4 vs Q1 OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.41 to 0.92) and apples (Q4 vs Q1 OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.34 to 0.77). An increased risk for CRC was found to be associated with intake of fruit juice (Q4 vs Q1 OR 1.74; 95% CI 1.24 to 2.45).

Conclusions Our results suggest that different F/V may confer different risks for cancer of the proximal colon, distal colon, or rectum. Future studies might consider taking into account the location of the tumor when examining the relation between F/V consumption and risk of CRC.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, American Dietetic Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042725

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 73 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 29 Feb 2012, 10:50:16 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.