Maternal vitamin D in pregnancy may influence not only offspring bone mass but other aspects of musculoskeletal health and adiposity

Pasco, Julie A., Wark, John D., Carlin, John B., Ponsonby, Anne-Louise, Vuillermin, Peter J. and Morley, Ruth 2008, Maternal vitamin D in pregnancy may influence not only offspring bone mass but other aspects of musculoskeletal health and adiposity, Medical hypotheses, vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 266-269.

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Title Maternal vitamin D in pregnancy may influence not only offspring bone mass but other aspects of musculoskeletal health and adiposity
Author(s) Pasco, Julie A.
Wark, John D.
Carlin, John B.
Ponsonby, Anne-Louise
Vuillermin, Peter J.
Morley, Ruth
Journal name Medical hypotheses
Volume number 71
Issue number 2
Start page 266
End page 269
Total pages 4
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2008-08
ISSN 0306-9877
1532-2777
Keyword(s) vitamin D
body composition
bone mass
Summary Osteoporotic fractures, falls and obesity are major health problems in developed nations. Evidence suggests that there are antenatal factors predisposing to these conditions. Data are emerging from Australia and elsewhere to suggest that maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy affects intrauterine skeletal mineralisation and skeletal growth together with muscle development and adiposity. Given that low levels of vitamin D have been documented in many urbanised populations, including those in countries with abundant sunlight, an important issue for public health is whether maternal vitamin D insufficiency during pregnancy has adverse effects on offspring health. The developing fetus may be exposed to low levels of vitamin D during critical phases of development as a result of maternal hypovitaminosis D. We hypothesise that this may have adverse effects on offspring musculoskeletal health and other aspects of body composition. Further research focused on the implications of poor gestational vitamin D nutrition is warranted as these developmental effects are likely to have a sustained influence on health during childhood and in adult life. We suggest that there is a clear rationale for randomised clinical trials to assess the potential benefits and harmful effects of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042827

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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