The exclusion of high trauma fractures may underestimate the prevalence of bone fragility fractures in the community : the Geelong Osteoporosis Study

Sanders, K. M., Pasco, J. A., Ugoni, A. M., Nicholson, G. C., Seeman, E., Martin, T. J., Skoric, B., Panahi, S. and Kotowicz, M. A. 1998, The exclusion of high trauma fractures may underestimate the prevalence of bone fragility fractures in the community : the Geelong Osteoporosis Study, Journal of bone and mineral research, vol. 13, no. 8, pp. 1337-1342.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The exclusion of high trauma fractures may underestimate the prevalence of bone fragility fractures in the community : the Geelong Osteoporosis Study
Author(s) Sanders, K. M.
Pasco, J. A.
Ugoni, A. M.
Nicholson, G. C.
Seeman, E.
Martin, T. J.
Skoric, B.
Panahi, S.
Kotowicz, M. A.
Journal name Journal of bone and mineral research
Volume number 13
Issue number 8
Start page 1337
End page 1342
Total pages 6
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell
Place of publication Durham, NC
Publication date 1998-08
ISSN 0884-0431
1523-4681
Keyword(s) Accidental Falls
Adult
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Australia
Bone Density
Densitometry, X-Ray
Summary Fractures associated with severe trauma are generally excluded from estimates of the prevalence of osteoporotic fractures in the community. Because the degree of trauma is difficult to quantitate, low bone mass may contribute to fractures following severe trauma. We ascertained all fractures in a defined population and compared the bone mineral density (BMD) of women who sustained fractures in either 'low' or 'high' trauma events with the BMD of a random sample of women from the same population. BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and expressed as a standardized deviation (Z score) adjusted for age. The BMD Z scores (mean ± SEM) were reduced in both the low and high trauma groups, respectively: spine-posterior-anterior (- 0.50 ± 0.05 and -0.21 ± 0.08), spine-lateral (-0.28 ± 0.06 and -0.19 ± 0.10), femoral neck (-0.42 ± 0.04 and -0.26 ± 0.09), Ward's triangle (- 0.44 ± 0.04 and -0.28 ± 0.08), trochanter (-0.44 ± 0.05 and -0.32 ± 0.08), total body (-0.46 ± 0.06 and -0.32 ± 0.08), ultradistal radius (- 0.47 ± 0.05 and -0.42 ± 0.07), and midradius (-0.52 ± 0.06 and -0.33 ± 0.09). Except at the PA spine, the deficits were no smaller in the high trauma group. Compared with the population, the age-adjusted odds ratio for osteoporosis (t-score < -2.5) at one or more scanning sites was 3.1 (95% confidence interval 1.9, 5.0) in the high trauma group and 2.7 (1.9, 3.8) in the low trauma group. The data suggest that the exclusion of high trauma fractures in women over 50 years of age may result in underestimation of the contribution of osteoporosis to fractures in the community. Bone density measurement of women over 50 years of age who sustain fractures may be warranted irrespective of the classification of trauma.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©1998, American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042835

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 107 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 119 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 32 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 05 Mar 2012, 11:17:34 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.