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History researcher development and research capacity in Australia and New Zealand

Evans, Terry, Brailsford, Ian and Macauley, Peter 2011, History researcher development and research capacity in Australia and New Zealand, International journal for researcher development, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 117-132.

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Title History researcher development and research capacity in Australia and New Zealand
Author(s) Evans, Terry
Brailsford, Ian
Macauley, Peter
Journal name International journal for researcher development
Volume number 2
Issue number 2
Start page 117
End page 132
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2011-12
ISSN 2048-8696
1759-751X
Keyword(s) Australia
New Zealand
Researcher development
Doctorates
Theses
History
Australian and New Zealand PhD history researcher development
Australian and New Zealand History PhD completions
Doctoral theses/dissertations
PhDs in History
Summary  This article presents data and discussion on history researcher development and research capacities in Australia and New Zealand, as evidenced in analysis of history PhD theses’ topics. The article is based on two independent studies of history PhD thesis topics, using a standard discipline coding system. It shows some marked differences in the Australian and New Zealand volumes and distributions of history PhDs, especially for PhDs conducted on non-local/national topics. These differences reflect national researcher development, research capacities and interests, in particular local, national and international histories, and have implications for the globalisation of scholarship. Thesis topics are used as a proxy for the graduate’s research capacity within that topic. However, as PhD examiners have attested to the significance and originality of the thesis, this is taken as robust. The longitudinal nature of the research suggests that subsequent years’ data and analysis would provide rich information on changes to history research capacity. Other comparative (i.e. international) studies would provide interesting analyses of history research capacity. There are practical implications for history departments in universities, history associations, and government (PhD policy, and history researcher development and research capacity in areas such as foreign affairs). There are social implications for local and community history in the knowledge produced in the theses, and in the development of local research capacity. The work in this article is the first to collate and analyse such thesis data either in Australia or New Zealand. The comparative analyses of the two datasets are also original.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
Socio Economic Objective 939999 Education and Training not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2011
Copyright notice ©2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30042843

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Education
Higher Education Research Group
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.