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The use of complementary and alternative medicine among people living with diabetes in Sydney

Manya, Kiran, Champion, Bernard and Dunning, Trisha 2012, The use of complementary and alternative medicine among people living with diabetes in Sydney, BMC complementary and alternative medicine, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 1-5, doi: 10.1186/1472-6882-12-2.

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Title The use of complementary and alternative medicine among people living with diabetes in Sydney
Author(s) Manya, Kiran
Champion, Bernard
Dunning, TrishaORCID iD for Dunning, Trisha orcid.org/0000-0002-0284-1706
Journal name BMC complementary and alternative medicine
Volume number 12
Issue number 2
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, U. K.
Publication date 2012-01
ISSN 1472-6882
Summary Background: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common in patients with chronic disease such as diabetes mellitus. The primary objective of the study was to determine the overall prevalence and type of CAM use in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM) in Western Sydney and to compare the prevalence and factors associated with CAM use with the literature.

Methods: A multicenter cross-sectional study was undertaken using a self-completed questionnaire distributed to patients with DM attending a public hospital and specialist endocrinology clinics in the region. The type of DM and pattern of CAM utilisation were analyzed.

Results: Sixty nine people responded to the questionnaire: age range of 18-75 years during a twelve week collection period. Overall, 32 respondents with diabetes were using some form of CAM, resulting in a utilisation rate of 46.3%. Twenty of the 32 CAM users used CAM specifically to treat their diabetes accounting for 28.9% of the respondent sample population. Multivitamins (40%), cinnamon, Co-enzyme q10 and prayer were the most frequently used CAM modalities. There was no significant difference between males and females, age range, income or diabetes complications between CAM and non-CAM users. (p values each > 0.05) The factor most significantly associated with CAM usage was being born overseas (p = 0.044).

Conclusions: Almost half the respondents (46.3%) used CAM: 28% used CAM specifically to treat their diabetes. Individuals born overseas were significantly more likely to use CAM than those born in Australia. Other factors such as age, gender, wealth and duration of living with diabetes were not associated with higher rate of CAM usage.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1472-6882-12-2
Field of Research 110499 Complementary and Alternative Medicine not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Manya et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043006

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.