Predictors and responses to the growth in physical violence during adolescence : a comparison of students in Washington State and Victoria, Australia

Herrenkohl, Todd I., Hemphill, Sheryl A., Mason, W. Alex, Toumbourou, John W. and Catalano, Richard F. 2012, Predictors and responses to the growth in physical violence during adolescence : a comparison of students in Washington State and Victoria, Australia, American journal of orthopsychiatry, vol. 82, no. 1, pp. 41-49.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Predictors and responses to the growth in physical violence during adolescence : a comparison of students in Washington State and Victoria, Australia
Author(s) Herrenkohl, Todd I.
Hemphill, Sheryl A.
Mason, W. Alex
Toumbourou, John W.
Catalano, Richard F.
Journal name American journal of orthopsychiatry
Volume number 82
Issue number 1
Start page 41
End page 49
Total pages 9
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Place of publication Hoboken, N. J.
Publication date 2012-01
ISSN 0002-9432
1939-0025
Keyword(s) adolescents
youth violence
risk factors
family conflict
school suspensions
arrests
Washington State
Victoria, Australia
Summary This study investigates patterns in violence over 3 time points in early to midadolescence in 2 statewide representative samples of youth, one in Washington State, USA, and the other in Victoria, Australia. Comparable data collection methods in both states were used to cross-nationally compare patterns of violence, risk factors, and responses to violence (school suspensions and arrests) in 2 policy contexts. Risk factors include early use of alcohol, binge drinking, involvement with antisocial peers, family conflict, poor family management, sensation seeking, and bully victimization. These are modeled as correlates of initial violence and predictors of change in violence over a 3-year period, from ages 12–15, for participating youth. Results suggest that patterns and predictors of violence are mostly similar in the 2 states. Initial levels of violence (age 13) and change over time in violence were associated in both states with more youth school suspensions and more police arrests in Grade 9. Some cross-national differences were also shown. For example, correlations of violence with gender and violence with binge drinking were stronger in Victoria, whereas correlations of violence with early use of alcohol and with antisocial peer involvement were stronger in Washington State. Antisocial peer involvement and family conflict were significant predictors of a gradual increase in violence from Grades 7–9 for youth in Victoria only. Implications are discussed with attention to prevention and intervention efforts.
Language eng
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, American Orthopsychiatric Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043010

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 51 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 07 Mar 2012, 10:45:16 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.