The impression that I get : educational inclusion explored through the voices of young people with vision impairment

Whitburn, Ben 2011, The impression that I get : educational inclusion explored through the voices of young people with vision impairment, in AARE 2011 : The proceedings of the 2011 AARE International Research in Education Conference : Researching Acrossa Boundaries, Australian Association for Research in Education, [Hobart, Tas.], pp. 1-13.

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Title The impression that I get : educational inclusion explored through the voices of young people with vision impairment
Author(s) Whitburn, Ben
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education International Education Research Conference (2011 : Hobart, Tasmania)
Conference location Hobart, Tas.
Conference dates 27 Nov. - 1 Dec. 2011
Title of proceedings AARE 2011 : The proceedings of the 2011 AARE International Research in Education Conference : Researching Acrossa Boundaries
Editor(s) Wright, Jan
Publication date 2011
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education International Education Research Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication [Hobart, Tas.]
Keyword(s) Inclusive education
Qualitative research
Researcher as insider
Student agency
Summary Despite the notion of educational inclusion of students with disabilities increasing in popularity, the day-to-day reality of its effectiveness remains mostly unknown. This paper reports key findings of a small-scale qualitative study that was conducted with a group of young people with vision impairment who attended an inclusive secondary school. The aim of the research was to ascertain their voiced experiences of their inclusion. Relevant to the study was the researcher’s insider status, which allowed for his unique insight and shared experiences with participants to influence data collection and analysis. The students reported a constant trade off that occurred between their aspirations for access and autonomy and practices of other stakeholders in the school that both facilitated and inhibited their inclusion. In sum, the students’ inclusion was ineffective because of habitual inhibiting actions of others. Recommendations are made based on Slee’s (2001) call for altered teaching and learning realities to promote educational inclusion, and a model of social justice that could bring about increased student agency (Higgins, Macarthur & Kelly, 2009).
ISSN 1324-9320
Language eng
Field of Research 130312 Special Education and Disability
130106 Secondary Education
Socio Economic Objective 939903 Equity and Access to Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2011
Copyright notice ©2011, Australian Association for Research in Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043078

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
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