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When, where and how am I now? Researching identity in university communities of practice

Ryan, Juliana and Walker-Gibbs, Bernadette 2011, When, where and how am I now? Researching identity in university communities of practice, in AARE 2011 : The proceedings of the 2011 AARE International Research in Education Conference : Researching Acrossa Boundaries, Australian Association for Research in Education, [Hobart, Tas.], pp. 1-13.

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Title When, where and how am I now? Researching identity in university communities of practice
Author(s) Ryan, Juliana
Walker-Gibbs, Bernadette
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2011 : Hobart, Tasmania)
Conference location Hobart, Tas.
Conference dates 27 Nov. - 1 Dec. 2011
Title of proceedings AARE 2011 : The proceedings of the 2011 AARE International Research in Education Conference : Researching Acrossa Boundaries
Editor(s) Wright, Jan
Publication date 2011
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication [Hobart, Tas.]
Keyword(s) identity
communities of practice
Summary The establishment of communities of practice (CoPs) has emerged nationally as a strategy to promote ‘excellence’ in teaching and learning in Australian universities. CoPs in Australian universities have been reported as fostering the development of identity in practice and collegial academic identity. In these accounts identity development is associated with storytelling around everyday practice, although the relationship between narrative and identity development has not been explored or described in detail. Similarly, although the complex and changeable university contexts in which these CoPs operate is noted and described in the literature, there is currently no detailed account published of the relationship between the broader discourses that shape these contexts and the process of identity development in university CoPs. We argue in this paper that there is a need for a new way of researching identity formation in university CoPs. Drawing on Trinh Minh Ha’s work (1992), we propose that fragmentation be used as a working metaphor for thinking about and researching identity development in university CoPs, with direct reference to the contexts in which they operate. 
The proposed new approach takes into account the complexities and variety of discourses that influence identity formation in CoPs and the changeable and sometimes contradictory Enterprise University contexts in which Australian CoPs operate. In this paper fragmentation is described and applied to the process of researching identity formation in university CoPs. This paper also describes how fragmentation guides the combined narrative research and discourse analysis methods used in the proposed approach. This paper argues that fragmentation provides the means for developing practical (or experiential) insights as well as conceptually structuring a useful method for investigating discursive factors, to open up a variety of potential new understandings about identity formation in university CoPs.
ISSN 1324-9320
Language eng
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
Socio Economic Objective 939999 Education and Training not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2011
Copyright notice ©2011, Australian Association for Research in Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043098

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
Higher Education Research Group
Open Access Collection
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