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Using job strain and organizational justice models to predict multiple forms of employee performance behaviours among Australian policing personnel

Noblet, Andrew, Maharee-Lawler, Saree and Rodwell, John 2012, Using job strain and organizational justice models to predict multiple forms of employee performance behaviours among Australian policing personnel, International journal of human resource management, vol. 23, no. 14, pp. 3009-3026, doi: 10.1080/09585192.2012.656989.

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Title Using job strain and organizational justice models to predict multiple forms of employee performance behaviours among Australian policing personnel
Author(s) Noblet, AndrewORCID iD for Noblet, Andrew orcid.org/0000-0002-3498-6838
Maharee-Lawler, Saree
Rodwell, John
Journal name International journal of human resource management
Volume number 23
Issue number 14
Start page 3009
End page 3026
Total pages 18
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2012-07
ISSN 0958-5192
1466-4399
Keyword(s) in-role behaviour
job stress
organizational citizenship behaviours
organizational justice
Summary The overall purpose of this investigation was to examine the relationship between stress-related working conditions and three forms of employee performance behaviours: in-role behaviours, citizenship behaviours directed at other individuals and citizenship behaviours directed at the organization. The potentially stressful working conditions were based on the job strain model (incorporating job demands, job control and social support) as well as organizational justice theory. A sample of Australian-based police officers (n = 640) took part in this study and the data were collected via a mail-out survey. Multiple regression analyses were undertaken to assess both the strength and the nature of the relationships between the working conditions and employee performance and these analyses included tests for additive, interactional and curvilinear effects. The overall results indicated that a significant proportion of the explained variance in all three outcome measures was attributed to the additive effects of demand, control and support. The level of variance associated with the organizational justice dimensions was relatively small, although there were signs that specific dimensions of justice may provide unique insights into the relationship between job stressors and employee performance. The implications of these and other notable findings are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/09585192.2012.656989
Field of Research 150311 Organisational Behaviour
Socio Economic Objective 910405 Public Sector Productivity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043103

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
Deakin Graduate School of Business
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Created: Mon, 12 Mar 2012, 15:24:14 EST by Katrina Fleming

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