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Needleless electrospinning : developments and performances

Niu, Haitao, Wang, Xungai and Lin, Tong 2011, Needleless electrospinning : developments and performances, in Nanofibers - production, properties and functional applications, InTech, Rijeka, Croatia, pp.17-36.

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Title Needleless electrospinning : developments and performances
Author(s) Niu, Haitao
Wang, Xungai
Lin, Tong
Title of book Nanofibers - production, properties and functional applications
Editor(s) Lin, Tong
Publication date 2011
Chapter number 2
Total chapters 21
Start page 17
End page 36
Total pages 20
Publisher InTech
Place of Publication Rijeka, Croatia
Keyword(s) nanomaterials
electrospinning
nanofiber
solution
nanoscience
nanotechnology
Summary Electrospinning technique has attracted a lot of interests recently, although it was invented in as early as 1934 by Anton (Anton, 1934). A basic electrospinning setup normally comprises a high voltage power supply, a syringe needle connected to power supply, and a counter-electrode collector as shown in Fig. 1. During electrospinning, a high electric voltage is applied to the polymer solution, which highly electrifies the solution droplet at the needle tip (Li & Xia, 2004). As a result, the solution droplet at the needle tip receives electric forces, drawing itself toward the opposite electrode, thus deforming into a conical shape (also known as “Taylor cone” (Taylor, 1969)). When the electric force overcomes the surface tension of the polymer solution, the polymer solution ejects off the tip of the “Taylor cone” to form a polymer jet. The charged jet is stretched by the strong electric force into a fine filament. Randomly deposited dry fibers can be obtained on the collector due to the evaporation of solvent in the filament. There are many factors affecting the electrospinning process and fiber properties, including polymer materials (e.g. polymer structure, molecular weight, solubility), solvent (e.g. boiling point, dielectric properties), solution properties (e.g. viscosity, concentration, conductivity, surface tension), operating conditions (e.g. applied voltage, collecting distance, flow rate), and ambient environment (e.g. temperature, gas environment, humidity).
ISBN 9789533074207
Language eng
Field of Research 100707 Nanomanufacturing
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category B2 Book chapter in non-commercially published book
Copyright notice ©2011, InTech
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043165

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation
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