You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Balancing the benefits and risks of public–private partnerships to address the global double burden of malnutrition

Kraak, Vivica I., Harrigan, Paige B., Lawrence, Mark, Harrison, Paul J., Jackson, Michaela A. and Swinburn, Boyd 2012, Balancing the benefits and risks of public–private partnerships to address the global double burden of malnutrition, Public health nutrition, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 503-517, doi: 10.1017/S1368980011002060.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
kraak-balancingthe-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 273.41KB 1003

Title Balancing the benefits and risks of public–private partnerships to address the global double burden of malnutrition
Author(s) Kraak, Vivica I.
Harrigan, Paige B.
Lawrence, MarkORCID iD for Lawrence, Mark orcid.org/0000-0001-6899-3983
Harrison, Paul J.
Jackson, Michaela A.
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 15
Issue number 3
Start page 503
End page 517
Total pages 15
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2012-03
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) public–private partnerships
double burden or malnutrition
due diligence
conflict of interest
codes of conduct
Summary Objective: Transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies, and their corporate foundations, may be potential collaborators to help address complex public health nutrition challenges. While UN system guidelines are available for private-sector engagement, non-governmental organizations (NGO) have limited guidelines to navigate diverse opportunities and challenges presented by partnering with these companies through public–private partnerships (PPP) to address the global double burden of malnutrition.

Design: We conducted a search of electronic databases, UN system websites and grey literature to identify resources about partnerships used to address the global double burden of malnutrition. A narrative summary provides a synthesis of the interdisciplinary literature identified.

Results: We describe partnership opportunities, benefits and challenges; and tools and approaches to help NGO engage with the private sector to address global public health nutrition challenges. PPP benefits include: raising the visibility of nutrition and health on policy agendas; mobilizing funds and advocating for research; strengthening food-system processes and delivery systems; facilitating technology transfer; and expanding access to medications, vaccines, healthy food and beverage products, and nutrition assistance during humanitarian crises. PPP challenges include: balancing private commercial interests with public health interests; managing conflicts of interest; ensuring that co-branded activities support healthy products and healthy eating environments; complying with ethical codes of conduct; assessing partnership compatibility; and evaluating partnership outcomes.

Conclusions: NGO should adopt a systematic and transparent approach using available tools and processes to maximize benefits and minimize risks of partnering with transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies to effectively target the global double burden of malnutrition.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S1368980011002060
Field of Research 111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
Socio Economic Objective 920205 Health Education and Promotion
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043233

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 24 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 29 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 386 Abstract Views, 982 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 15 Mar 2012, 09:32:38 EST by Leanne Swaneveld

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.