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Advancing Australian 'shared security' : secular-religious peacebuilding networks

Halafoff, Anna 2007, Advancing Australian 'shared security' : secular-religious peacebuilding networks, in TASA 2007 Conference Proceedings : Public Sociologies : Lessons and Trans-Tasman Comparisons, Sociological Association of Australia (TASA), Auckland, N. Z., pp. 1-7.

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Title Advancing Australian 'shared security' : secular-religious peacebuilding networks
Author(s) Halafoff, Anna
Conference name Australian Sociological Association. Conference (2007 : Auckland, N. Z.)
Conference location Auckland, N. Z.
Conference dates 4-7 Dec. 2007
Title of proceedings TASA 2007 Conference Proceedings : Public Sociologies : Lessons and Trans-Tasman Comparisons
Editor(s) Curtis, B.
Matthewman, S.
McIntosh, T.
Publication date 2007
Conference series Australian Sociological Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher Sociological Association of Australia (TASA)
Place of publication Auckland, N. Z.
Keyword(s) religious leaders
shared security
multifaith movement
religiously diverse communities
negative stereotypes
Summary The role of religious leaders in promoting social cohesion and ‘shared security’ is increasingly being examined by scholars, as is the growing multifaith movement. The VIIIth World Assembly of Religions for Peace first proposed the notion of ‘shared security’ and the importance of religious leaders’ role in advancing such a concept in Kyoto 2006. A recent study, Managing the Impact of Global Crisis Events on Community Relations in Multicultural Australia (Bouma et al. 2007) has documented the impacts of international crisis events and discourses of exclusion on religiously diverse communities in Australia, in particular rising Islamophobia, migrantophobia and attacks on multiculturalism. Religious communities have been far from passive in their responses to the impact of these events initiating dialogue and educational activities to dispel negative stereotypes and attitudes. State actors, including police, have prioritized engagement with religious leaders resulting in a rise of state supported multifaith and secular-religious peacebuilding activities. This paper argues that, in response to global risks of terror and exclusion, secular-religious networks including religious leaders, state actors, educators and the media have the potential to advance ‘shared security’ in multifaith societies, by drawing on Australian experiences documented in the Global Crisis Events study.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 169999 Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2007, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043759

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.