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Prescribed fluid consumption and its effects on the physiology and work behaviour of Australian wildland firefighters

Raines, Jenni, Snow, Rodney, Petersen, Aaron, Harvey, Jack, Onus, Katrina, Jefferies, Sarah, Nichols, David and Aisbett, Brad 2011, Prescribed fluid consumption and its effects on the physiology and work behaviour of Australian wildland firefighters, in Proceedings of Bushfire CRC & AFAC 2011 Conference Science Day, Bushfire Cooperative Research Centre, East Melbourne, Vic., pp. 248-257.

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Title Prescribed fluid consumption and its effects on the physiology and work behaviour of Australian wildland firefighters
Author(s) Raines, Jenni
Snow, Rodney
Petersen, Aaron
Harvey, Jack
Onus, Katrina
Jefferies, Sarah
Nichols, David
Aisbett, Brad
Conference name The Bushfire Cooperative Research Centre & The Australasian Fire and Emergency Services Authorities Council Conference Science Day (2011 : Sydney, NS.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N.S.W.
Conference dates 1 Sep. 2011
Title of proceedings Proceedings of Bushfire CRC & AFAC 2011 Conference Science Day
Editor(s) Thornton, R. P.
Publication date 2011
Conference series The AFAC & Bushfire CRC Conference Science Day
Start page 248
End page 257
Total pages 326 p.
Publisher Bushfire Cooperative Research Centre
Place of publication East Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) bushfire
hydration
Summary The present study examined firefighters' ability to consume a prescribed fluid volume (1200 ml · h-1) during a wildland fire suppression shift and compare the effect of this additional fluid prescription with self-paced drinking on firefighters' hydration status and plasma sodium concentration post shift and their heart rate, core temperature and physical activity during their shift. Thirty-four firefighters were evenly divided into two drinking groups: self paced and prescribed. Prescribed drinkers did not meet the required 1200 ml·h-1 intake, yet they consumed twice the fluid drank by the self-paced group. No differences were noted between groups in plasma sodium levels or hydration status before or after their shift. Prescribed fluid consumption resulted in significantly lower core temperature between two and six hours into the shift. This did not coincide with lower cardiovascular strain, greater physical activity when compared to the self-paced drinking group. Additional fluid consumption (above self-paced intake) did not improve firefighter activity or physiological function (though it may buffer rising core temperature). It seems that wildland firefighters, at least in mild to warm weather conditions, can self-regulate their fluid consumption and work behaviour to leave the fireground hydrated at the conclusion of their shift.
Notes The science day was the final day of The AFAC & Bushfire CRC annual conference held from 29th August to 1st September 2011
ISBN 9780980675993
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920505 Occupational Health
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2011, Bushfire Cooperative Research Centre
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043861

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.