Individual, social, and physical environment factors associated with electronic media use among children : sedentary behavior at home

Granich, Joanna, Rosenberg, Michael, Knuiman, Matthew W. and Timperio, Anna 2011, Individual, social, and physical environment factors associated with electronic media use among children : sedentary behavior at home, Journal of physical activity and health, vol. 8, no. 5, pp. 613-625.

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Title Individual, social, and physical environment factors associated with electronic media use among children : sedentary behavior at home
Author(s) Granich, Joanna
Rosenberg, Michael
Knuiman, Matthew W.
Timperio, Anna
Journal name Journal of physical activity and health
Volume number 8
Issue number 5
Start page 613
End page 625
Total pages 13
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2011-07
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Keyword(s) youth
family
television viewing
physical activity
body mass index
Summary Background: Individual, home social and physical environment correlates of electronic media (EM) use among children were examined and pattern of differences on school and weekend days.
Methods: Youth (n = 298) aged 11 to 12 years self-reported time spent using EM (TV, video/DVD, computer use, and electronic games) on a typical school and a weekend day, each dichotomized at the median to indicate heavy and light EM users. Anthropometric measurements were taken. Logistic regression examined correlates of EM use.
Results: In total, 87% of participants exceeded electronic media use recommendations of ≤ 2 hrs/day. Watching TV during breakfast (OR = 3.17) and after school (OR = 2.07), watching TV with mother (OR = 1.96), no rule(s) limiting time for computer game usage (OR = 2.30), having multiple (OR = 2.99) EM devices in the bedroom and BMI (OR = 1.15) were associated with higher odds of being heavy EM user on a school day. Boys (OR = 2.35) and participants who usually watched TV at midday (OR = 2.91) and late at night (OR = 2.04) had higher odds of being a heavy EM user on the weekend.
Conclusions:
Efforts to modify children’s EM use should focus on a mix of intervention strategies that address patterns and reinforcement of TV viewing, household rules limiting screen time, and the presence of EM devices in the child’s bedroom.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011 Human Kinetics, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30043875

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research
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