Taxonomy of two new species of gall midge (Diptera : Cecidomyiidae) infesting Tecticornia arbuscula (Salicornioideae : Chenopodiaceae) in Australian saltmarshes

Veenstra, Anneke A., Michalczyk, Agnes and Kolesik, Peter 2011, Taxonomy of two new species of gall midge (Diptera : Cecidomyiidae) infesting Tecticornia arbuscula (Salicornioideae : Chenopodiaceae) in Australian saltmarshes, Australian journal of entomology, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 393-404.

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Title Taxonomy of two new species of gall midge (Diptera : Cecidomyiidae) infesting Tecticornia arbuscula (Salicornioideae : Chenopodiaceae) in Australian saltmarshes
Formatted title Taxonomy of two new species of gall midge (Diptera : Cecidomyiidae) infesting Tecticornia arbuscula (Salicornioideae : Chenopodiaceae) in Australian saltmarshes
Author(s) Veenstra, Anneke A.
Michalczyk, Agnes
Kolesik, Peter
Journal name Australian journal of entomology
Volume number 50
Issue number 4
Start page 393
End page 404
Total pages 12
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of publication Richmond, Vic.
Publication date 2011-11
ISSN 1326-6756
1440-6055
Keyword(s) asphondylia
botrysphaeria
insect taxonomy
platygastridae
sclerostegia
tecticornia
Summary Two new species of gall midge associated with two leaf galls on the branched, perennial shrub Tecticornia arbuscula are described from saltmarshes in south-eastern Australia. The infestations caused by the new species hinder the growth of T. arbuscula which can impact on the critically endangered Orange Bellied Parrot (Neophema chrysogaster): T. arbuscula provides perching and roosting sites and the seeds are the major food source for this bird. Asphondylia tecticorniae sp. n. Veenstra & Kolesik transforms leaf segments into single-chambered, spherical galls, whereas Asphondylia peelei sp. n. Veenstra & Kolesik produces a multi-chambered, asymmetrical gall on leaves of the same plant. Both galls have fungal mycelium lining the inner surface of the larval chamber where it is presumably grazed on by the larva. Descriptions of the larvae, pupae, males, females and geographical distribution of the two gall midges in south-eastern Australia are given. Differences in the level of parasitoid infestation of four Asphondylia species feeding on Australian Chenopodiaceae in relation to putative oviposition sites on the host plants are explored.
Language eng
Field of Research 060899 Zoology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 960803 Documentation of Undescribed Flora and Fauna
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30044136

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