Effects of bait age, larval chemical cues and nutrient depletion on colonization by forensically important calliphorid and sarcophagid flies

George, K. A., Archer, M. S. and Toop, T. 2012, Effects of bait age, larval chemical cues and nutrient depletion on colonization by forensically important calliphorid and sarcophagid flies, Medical and veterinary entomology, vol. 26, pp. 188-193.


Title Effects of bait age, larval chemical cues and nutrient depletion on colonization by forensically important calliphorid and sarcophagid flies
Author(s) George, K. A.
Archer, M. S.
Toop, T.
Journal name Medical and veterinary entomology
Volume number 26
Start page 188
End page 193
Total pages 6
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012
ISSN 0269-283X
1365-2915
Keyword(s) calliphoridae
chemical cues
diptera
ecological succession
forensic entomology
minimum post-mortem interval
Summary Species colonization patterns on corpses and the frequency of carrion fly oviposition and larviposition are affected by decomposition stage and previous maggot colonization. This study investigated these effects on meat bait colonization by Victorian Diptera of forensic importance. Bait treatments were: 'aged' (aged for 4 days at 22 °C, allowing some decomposition); 'nutrient-depleted' [aged for 4 days at 22 °C with feeding Calliphora vicina (Robineau-Desvoidy) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larvae]; 'extract' (fresh bait mixed with liquid formed by feeding C. vicina larvae), and 'fresh' (untreated control bait). Statistical analysis (α = 0.05) revealed that colonization frequency differed significantly among treatments (Welch's F 3,18.83 = 4.66, P < 0.05). Post hoc tests showed that fresh and extract baits were colonized extensively throughout the experiment with no significant difference, whereas the colonization of nutrient-depleted baits was significantly lower. This suggests that larval digestive enzymes, larval excreta and cuticular hydrocarbons have less effect on colonizing Diptera than the nutritional content of meat. The colonization of aged baits did not differ significantly from that of fresh, extract or nutrient-depleted baits. A further experiment testing 'very aged' (aged for 8 days at 28 °C), 'larvae-added' (fresh bait with C. vicina larvae added before placement) and 'fresh' (untreated control) baits revealed that very aged baits were colonized significantly less frequently than either fresh or larvae-added baits (Welch's F 2, 6.17 = 17.40, P < 0.05).
Language eng
Field of Research 060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970103 Expanding Knowledge in the Chemical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, The Royal Entomological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30044355

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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