Openly accessible

Distant relations : limits to relational contracting in domestic violence programmes

Carson, Ed, Chung, Donna and Day, Andrew 2012, Distant relations : limits to relational contracting in domestic violence programmes, International journal of public sector management, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 103-117.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
day-distantrelations-post-2012.pdf Author post print application/pdf 363.95KB 87

Title Distant relations : limits to relational contracting in domestic violence programmes
Author(s) Carson, Ed
Chung, Donna
Day, Andrew
Journal name International journal of public sector management
Volume number 25
Issue number 2
Start page 103
End page 117
Total pages 15
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2012
ISSN 0951-3558
1758-6666
Keyword(s) Contracting out
Domestic violence
Social welfare
Human services
Programme evaluation
Summary Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess the applicability of relational contract theory in situations where government departments contract with non-government welfare organisations to deliver human service programmes. Its limits are highlighted by an assessment of programmes for domestically violent men that epitomise “management of incomplete contracts” central to the theory.

Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on an evaluation of contracted-out programmes for perpetrators of domestic violence in Australia that set out to compare and contrast distinct models of service delivery by documenting programme logic, service delivery effectiveness and effects on programme participants. It reflects on the difficulties of monitoring such programmes and considers the implications of this for contracting theory and for human service practice.

Findings – In contrast to critiques of contracting-out in a neo-liberal environment that emphasise how accountability and reporting requirements limit the autonomy of contracted agencies, this paper highlights considerable variation in how programmes were managed and delivered despite standardised service delivery contracts developed by the government department funding the programmes. This leads to a consideration of “incomplete contracts” where service delivery outcomes are hard to measure or there is limited knowledge of the contracted agencies by the contracting government department.

Originality/value – The paper highlights a situation in which the recommendations of relational contracting theory can exacerbate the difficulties of quality assurance rather than minimise them. It then argues a need for workforce development in the government departments and the contracted agencies, to enable a nuanced monitoring of the programmes' service delivery and promotion of quality assurance processes.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 180102 Access to Justice
Socio Economic Objective 940403 Criminal Justice
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30044425

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 89 Abstract Views, 88 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 17 Apr 2012, 15:28:41 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.