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Reduced food access due to a lack of money, inability to lift and lack of access to a car for food shopping : a multilevel study in Melbourne, Victoria

Burns, Cate, Bentley, Rebecca, Thornton, Lukar and Kavanagh, Anne 2011, Reduced food access due to a lack of money, inability to lift and lack of access to a car for food shopping : a multilevel study in Melbourne, Victoria, Public health nutrition, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 1017-1023.

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Title Reduced food access due to a lack of money, inability to lift and lack of access to a car for food shopping : a multilevel study in Melbourne, Victoria
Author(s) Burns, Cate
Bentley, Rebecca
Thornton, Lukar
Kavanagh, Anne
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 14
Issue number 6
Start page 1017
End page 1023
Total pages 7
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2011-06
ISSN 1368-9800
Keyword(s) Food security
Food access
Multilevel study
Summary Objective: To describe associations between demographic and individual and arealevel socio-economic variables and restricted household food access due to lack of money, inability to lift groceries and lack of access to a car to do food shopping.
Design: Multilevel study of three measures of restricted food access, i.e. running out of money to buy food, inability to lift groceries and lack of access to a car for food shopping. Multilevel logistic regression was conducted to examine the risk of each of these outcomes according to demographic and socio-economic variables.
Setting: Random selection of households from fifty small areas in Melbourne, Australia, in 2003.
Subjects: The main food shoppers in each household (n 2564).
Results: A lack of money was significantly more likely among the young and in households with single adults. Difficultly lifting was more likely among the elderly and those born overseas. The youngest and highest age groups both reported reduced car access, as did those born overseas and single-adult households. All three factors were most likely among those with a lower individual or household socio-economic position. Increased levels of area disadvantage were independently associated with difficultly lifting and reduced car access.
Conclusions: In Melbourne, households with lower individual socio-economic position and area disadvantage have restricted access to food because of a lack of money and/or having physical limitations due difficulty lifting or lack of access to a car for food shopping. Further research is required to explore the relationship between physical restrictions and food access.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30044455

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.