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Baby boomers' reasons for choosing specific food shops

Worsley, Tony, Wang, Wei Chun and Hunter, Wendy 2011, Baby boomers' reasons for choosing specific food shops, International journal of retail and distribution management incorporating retail insights, vol. 39, no. 11, pp. 867-882.

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Title Baby boomers' reasons for choosing specific food shops
Author(s) Worsley, Tony
Wang, Wei Chun
Hunter, Wendy
Journal name International journal of retail and distribution management incorporating retail insights
Volume number 39
Issue number 11
Start page 867
End page 882
Total pages 16
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing Ltd
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2011-10
ISSN 0959-0552
1758-6690
Keyword(s) Australia
Consumer behaviour
Baby boomer generation
Shopping behaviour
Food
Survey
Summary Purpose – Baby boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964) are approaching retirement and there is concern about their preparation for their future health and wellbeing. Food shopping is likely to play a major role in their future lives. The purpose of this paper is to examine their reasons for choosing to buy food from particular shops and whether demographic characteristics and health status were associated with them.

Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire survey was conducted among a random sample of 1,037 people aged between 40 and 71 years in Victoria, Australia. Respondents were asked to indicate, from a list, their reasons for choosing to shop at particular food outlets. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between respondents' demographics and health status and their reasons for shopping at the food stores.

Findings – Multivariate analysis showed that the reasons the respondents reported in choosing shops fell into four groups: saving, convenience, quality and healthy foods, and user-friendly environment. Saving was negatively related to income, age, level of education and also linked with country of birth, religious affiliation, and marital status. Convenience was negatively associated with age and also related to health status and religious affiliation. Quality/healthy food products were positively related to age but negatively associated with body mass index, and also linked to country of birth. User-friendly environment was negatively associated with income and education and related to gender and religious affiliation.

Originality/value – The paper's results show that stores could provide more information, perhaps as signage, to their recycling and health information facilities, particularly in low socio-economic status areas. Furthermore, the social status and religious associations confirm the view that shopping reflects broad societal affiliations among baby boomers. Shopping centres can be used to provide support for health and environmental sustainability promotions.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Emerald Group Publishing Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30044467

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.