The pillory effect : media, the courts and the punitive role of public shaming in Australia

Waller, Lisa and Hess, Kristy 2011, The pillory effect : media, the courts and the punitive role of public shaming in Australia, Media and arts law review, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 229-240.

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Title The pillory effect : media, the courts and the punitive role of public shaming in Australia
Author(s) Waller, Lisa
Hess, Kristy
Journal name Media and arts law review
Volume number 16
Issue number 3
Start page 229
End page 240
Total pages 12
Publisher LexisNexis Butterworths
Place of publication Chatswood, N.S.W.
Publication date 2011-09
ISSN 1325-1570
Keyword(s) media
courts
Summary Public shaming and humiliation have been used across cultures for centuries to punish offenders and define the boundaries of acceptable behaviour for communities. This article argues that since court-imposed shaming sanctions were phased out in Australia, the news media has assumed responsibility for performing this cultural practice. Through critical engagement with some of the research literature on shaming, the historical shift to the media as the modern pillory is explored. This article looks beyond the doctrine of open justice, which assigns the news media a dual role as a watchdog against injustice and a conduit between the courts and the public, to consider its role in shaming and suggest this role continues to evolve in a changing media landscape.
Language eng
Field of Research 200104 Media Studies
Socio Economic Objective 950204 The Media
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2011
Copyright notice ©2011, LexisNexis Butterworths
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30044525

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