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Adaptive depletion for improvement of MPEG video compression

Tan, Daniel, Venkatesh, Svetha and West, Geoffrey A. W. 1996, Adaptive depletion for improvement of MPEG video compression, in SPIE 1996 : Proceedings of SPIE - the International Society for Optical Engineering, SPIE, Bellingham, Wash., pp. 154-168.

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Title Adaptive depletion for improvement of MPEG video compression
Author(s) Tan, Daniel
Venkatesh, Svetha
West, Geoffrey A. W.
Conference name Digital Video Compression : Algorithms and Technologies (1996 : San Jose, Calif.)
Conference location San Jose, Calif.
Conference dates 31 Jan.-2 Feb. 1996
Title of proceedings SPIE 1996 : Proceedings of SPIE - the International Society for Optical Engineering
Editor(s) Bhaskaran, Vasudev
Sijstermans, Frans
Panchanathan, Sethuraman
Publication date 1996
Conference series Digital Video Compression : Algorithms and Technologies
Start page 154
End page 168
Total pages 15
Publisher SPIE
Place of publication Bellingham, Wash.
Keyword(s) adaptive spatial subsampling
picket fence effect
Summary Traditional data compression algorithms for 2D images work using the information theoretic paradigm, attempting to reduce redundant information by as much as possible. However, through the use of a depletion algorithm that takes advantage of characteristics of the human visual system, images can be displayed using only half or a quarter of the original information with no appreciable loss of quality.

The characteristics of the human visual system that allows the viewer to perceive a higher rate of information than is actually displayed is known as the beta or picket fence effect. It is called the picket fence effect because its effect is noticeable when a person is travelling along a picket fence. Despite the person not having an unimpeded view of the objects behind the fence at any instant, as the person is moving, the objects behind the picket fence are clearly visible. In fact, in most cases the fence is hardly noticeable at all.

The techniques we have developed uses this effect to achieve higher levels of compression than would otherwise be possible. As a fundamental characteristic of the beta effect is the requirement that there is movement of the fence in relation to the object, the beta effect can only be used in image sequences where movement between the depletion pattern and objects within the image can be achieved.

As MPEG is the recognised standard by which image sequences are coded, compatibility with MPEG is essential. We have modified our technique such that it performs in conjunction with MPEG, providing further compression over MPEG.
ISBN 0819420425
ISSN 0277-786X
Language eng
Field of Research 089999 Information and Computing Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©1996, SPIE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30044553

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Information Technology
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