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A cluster-randomized controlled trial to reduce sedentary behavior and promote physical activity and health of 8-9 year olds : the transform-us! study

Salmon, Jo, Arundell, Lauren, Hume, Clare, Brown, Helen, Hesketh, Kylie, Dunstan, David W., Daly, Robin M., Pearson, Natalie, Cerin, Ester, Moodie, Marj, Sheppard, Lauren, Ball, Kylie, Bagley, Sarah, Paw, Mai Chin A. and Crawford, David 2011, A cluster-randomized controlled trial to reduce sedentary behavior and promote physical activity and health of 8-9 year olds : the transform-us! study, BMC public health, vol. 11, no. 759, pp. 1-14.

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Title A cluster-randomized controlled trial to reduce sedentary behavior and promote physical activity and health of 8-9 year olds : the transform-us! study
Author(s) Salmon, Jo
Arundell, Lauren
Hume, Clare
Brown, Helen
Hesketh, Kylie
Dunstan, David W.
Daly, Robin M.
Pearson, Natalie
Cerin, Ester
Moodie, Marj
Sheppard, Lauren
Ball, Kylie
Bagley, Sarah
Paw, Mai Chin A.
Crawford, David
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 11
Issue number 759
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) controlled trial
sedentary behavior
physical activity
Summary Background: Physical activity (PA) is associated with positive cardio-metabolic health and emerging evidence suggests sedentary behavior (SB) may be detrimental to children’s health independent of PA. The primary aim of the Transform-Us! study is to determine whether an 18-month, behavioral and environmental intervention in the school and family settings results in higher levels of PA and lower rates of SB among 8-9 year old children compared with usual practice (post-intervention and 12-months follow-up). The secondary aims are to determine the independent and combined effects of PA and SB on children’s cardio-metabolic health risk factors; identify the factors that mediate the success of the intervention; and determine whether the intervention is cost-effective.
Methods/design: A four-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a 2 × 2 factorial design, with schools as the unit of randomization. Twenty schools will be allocated to one of four intervention groups, sedentary behavior (SB-I), physical activity (PA-I), combined SB and PA (SB+PA-I) or current practice control (C), which will be evaluated among approximately 600 children aged 8-9 years in school year 3 living in Melbourne, Australia. All children in year 3 at intervention schools in 2010 (8-9 years) will receive the intervention over an 18-month period with a maintenance ‘booster’ delivered in 2012 and children at all schools will be invited to participate in the evaluation assessments. To maximize the sample and to capture new students arriving at intervention and control schools, recruitment will be on-going up to the post-intervention time point. Primary outcomes are time spent sitting and in PA assessed via accelerometers and inclinometers and survey.
Discussion: To our knowledge, Transform-Us! is the first RCT to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies for reducing children’s overall sedentary time, promoting PA and optimizing health outcomes. The integration of consistent strategies and messages to children from teachers and parents in both school and family settings is a critical component of this study, and if shown to be effective, may have a significant impact on educational policies as well as on pedagogical and parenting practices.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30044698

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.