The association between habitual diet quality and the common mental disorders in community-dwelling adults : The Hordaland health study

Jacka, Felice N., Mykletun, Arnstein, Berk, Michael, Bjelland, Ingvar and Tell, Grethe S. 2011, The association between habitual diet quality and the common mental disorders in community-dwelling adults : The Hordaland health study, Psychosomatic medicine, vol. 73, no. 6, pp. 483-490.

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Title The association between habitual diet quality and the common mental disorders in community-dwelling adults : The Hordaland health study
Author(s) Jacka, Felice N.
Mykletun, Arnstein
Berk, Michael
Bjelland, Ingvar
Tell, Grethe S.
Journal name Psychosomatic medicine
Volume number 73
Issue number 6
Start page 483
End page 490
Total pages 8
Publisher Lippincott William & Wilkins
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2011-07
ISSN 0033-3174
1534-7796
Keyword(s) depression
anxiety
diet
nutrition
Summary Objective Recent evidence suggests a role for diet quality in the common mental disorders depression and anxiety. We aimed to investigate the association between diet quality, dietary patterns, and the common mental disorders in Norwegian adults.

Methods
This cross-sectional study included 5731 population-based men and women aged 46 to 49 and 70 to 74 years. Habitual diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and mental health was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.

Results After adjustments for variables including age, education, income, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption, an a priori healthy diet quality score was inversely related to depression (odds ratio [OR] = 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.59–0.84) and anxiety (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.68–0.87) in women and to depression (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.70–0.99) in men. Women scoring higher on a healthy dietary pattern were less likely to be depressed (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.57–0.82) or anxious (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.77–0.98), whereas men were more likely to be anxious (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.03–1.38). A traditional Norwegian dietary pattern was also associated with reduced depression in women (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.64–0.92) and anxiety in men (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.61–0.96). A western-type diet was associated with increased anxiety in men (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.14–1.42) and women (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.17–1.43) before final adjustment for energy intake.

Conclusions
In this study, those with better quality diets were less likely to be depressed, whereas a higher intake of processed and unhealthy foods was associated with increased anxiety.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Lippincott William & Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30045034

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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