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No difference in 1RM strength and muscle activation during the barbell chest press on a stable and unstable surface

Goodman, Craig A., Pearce, Alan J., Nicholes, Caleb J., Gatt, Brad M. and Fairweather, Ian H. 2008, No difference in 1RM strength and muscle activation during the barbell chest press on a stable and unstable surface, Journal of strength and conditioning research, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 88-94.

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Title No difference in 1RM strength and muscle activation during the barbell chest press on a stable and unstable surface
Author(s) Goodman, Craig A.
Pearce, Alan J.
Nicholes, Caleb J.
Gatt, Brad M.
Fairweather, Ian H.
Journal name Journal of strength and conditioning research
Volume number 22
Issue number 1
Start page 88
End page 94
Total pages 7
Publisher Human Kinetics Publishers
Place of publication Lincoln, Neb.
Publication date 2008-01
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Keyword(s) strength training
chest press
bench press
1RM strength
EMG
instability
Summary Exercise or Swiss balls are increasingly being used with conventional resistance exercises. There is little evidence supporting the efficacy of this approach compared to traditional resistance training on a stable surface. Previous studies have shown that force output may be reduced with no change in muscle electromyography (EMG) activity while others have shown increased muscle EMG activity when performing resistance exercises on an unstable surface. This study compared 1RM strength, and upper body and trunk muscle EMG activity during the barbell chest press exercise on a stable (flat bench) and unstable surface (exercise ball). After familiarization, 13 subjects underwent testing for 1RM strength for the barbell chest press on both a stable bench and an exercise ball, each separated by at least 7 days. Surface EMG was recorded for 5 upper body muscles and one trunk muscle from which average root mean square of the muscle activity was calculated for the whole 1RM lift and the concentric and eccentric phases. Elbow angle during each lift was recorded to examine any range-of-motion differences between the two surfaces. The results show that there was no difference in 1RM strength or muscle EMG activity for the stable and unstable surfaces. In addition, there was no difference in elbow range-of-motion between the two surfaces. Taken together, these results indicate that there is no reduction in 1RM strength or any differences in muscle EMG activity for the barbell chest press exercise on an unstable exercise ball when compared to a stable flat surface. Moreover, these results do not support the notion that resistance exercises performed on an exercise ball are more efficacious than traditional stable exercises.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Human Kinetics
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30045178

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.