Insights into the biodiversity and social benchmarking components of the Northern Australian fire management and carbon abatement programmes

Fitzsimons, James, Russell-Smith, Jeremy, James, Glenn, Vigilante, Tom, Lipsett-Moore, Geoff, Morrison, Joe and Looker, Michael 2012, Insights into the biodiversity and social benchmarking components of the Northern Australian fire management and carbon abatement programmes, Ecological management and restoration, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 51-57.

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Title Insights into the biodiversity and social benchmarking components of the Northern Australian fire management and carbon abatement programmes
Author(s) Fitzsimons, James
Russell-Smith, Jeremy
James, Glenn
Vigilante, Tom
Lipsett-Moore, Geoff
Morrison, Joe
Looker, Michael
Journal name Ecological management and restoration
Volume number 13
Issue number 1
Start page 51
End page 57
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2012-01
ISSN 1442-7001
Keyword(s) benchmarking
Indigenous fire regimes
Indigenous livelihoods
monitoring
tropical savannas
Summary Much of northern Australia’s tropical savannas are subject to annual intense and extensive late dry season wildfires, much of this occurring on Aboriginal land. Based on the successful West Arnhem Land Fire Abatement (WALFA) model, which has resulted in significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions, fire abatement programmes are planned for other significant regions of northern Australia. This study offers an introduction to the ideas behind a proposed environmental and social benchmarking project that aims to evaluate the potential benefits of expanding the fire abatement program in northern Australia, under the leadership of NAILSMA and its partners. Gaining a better understanding of the biodiversity, social and cultural outcomes of these fire abatement activities is an important component of demonstrating multiple benefits of these programmes. We emphasize the role of both biodiversity and cultural mapping to establish benchmarks and baseline states, with the involvement of Indigenous communities being a key element to optimize social and biodiversity benefits. Consultation with Traditional Owners and ranger groups to establish an agreed set of targets, indicators and sampling protocols and methodologies are critical component of this process. Examples of preliminary work to date are provided.
Language eng
Field of Research 050201 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Knowledge
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
050205 Environmental Management
Socio Economic Objective 960501 Ecosystem Assessment and Management at Regional or Larger Scales
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Ecological Society of Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30045423

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Created: Fri, 18 May 2012, 13:59:29 EST by James Fitzsimons

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