The cost-effectiveness of universal newborn screening for bilateral permanent congenital hearing impairment : systematic review

Colgan, Stephen, Gold, Lisa, Wirth, Karen, Ching, Teresa, Poulakis, Zeffie, Rickards, Field and Wake, Melissa 2012, The cost-effectiveness of universal newborn screening for bilateral permanent congenital hearing impairment : systematic review, Academic pediatrics, vol. 12, no. 3, May-June, pp. 171-180.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The cost-effectiveness of universal newborn screening for bilateral permanent congenital hearing impairment : systematic review
Author(s) Colgan, Stephen
Gold, Lisa
Wirth, Karen
Ching, Teresa
Poulakis, Zeffie
Rickards, Field
Wake, Melissa
Journal name Academic pediatrics
Volume number 12
Issue number 3
Season May-June
Start page 171
End page 180
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2012-05
ISSN 1876-2859
1876-2867
Keyword(s) bilateral
cost-benefit analyses
hearing loss
neonatal screening
review, systematic
Summary Objective - Universal newborn hearing screening for bilateral permanent congenital hearing impairment is standard practice in many developed economies, but until there is clear evidence of cost-effectiveness, it remains a controversial use of limited health care resources. We conducted a formal systematic review of studies of newborn hearing screening that considered both costs and outcomes to produce a summary of the available evidence and to determine whether there was a need for further research.

Methods - A search was conducted of medical and nursing databases and gray literature websites by the use of multiple keywords. The titles and abstracts of studies were examined for preliminary inclusion if reference was made to newborn hearing screening, and to both costs and outcomes. Studies of potential relevance were independently assessed by 2 health economists for final inclusion in the review. Studies that met inclusion criteria were appraised by the use of existing guidelines for observational studies, economic evaluations and decision analytic models, and reported in a narrative literature review.

Results -
There were 22 distinct observational or modeled evaluations of which only 2 clearly compared universal newborn hearing screening to risk factor screening for bilateral permanent congenital hearing impairment. Of these, the single evaluation that examined long-term costs and outcomes found that universal newborn hearing screening could be cost-saving if early intervention led to a substantial reduction in future treatment costs and productivity losses.

Conclusions - There are only a small number of economic evaluations that have examined the long-term cost-effectiveness of universal newborn hearing screening. This is partly attributable to ongoing uncertainty about the benefits gained from the early detection and treatment of bilateral permanent congenital hearing impairment. There is a clear need for further research on long-term costs and outcomes to establish the cost-effectiveness of universal newborn hearing screening in relation to other approaches to screening, and to establish whether it is a good long term investment.
Language eng
Field of Research 140208 Health Economics
Socio Economic Objective 920207 Health Policy Economic Outcomes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Academic Pediatric Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30045488

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Population Health
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 97 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 23 May 2012, 10:54:09 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.