The association between parental personality patterns and internalising and externalising behaviour problems in children and adolescents

Bertino, Melanie D., Connell, Gabrielle and Lewis, Andrew J. 2012, The association between parental personality patterns and internalising and externalising behaviour problems in children and adolescents, Clinical psychologist, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 110-117.

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Title The association between parental personality patterns and internalising and externalising behaviour problems in children and adolescents
Author(s) Bertino, Melanie D.
Connell, Gabrielle
Lewis, Andrew J.
Journal name Clinical psychologist
Volume number 16
Issue number 3
Start page 110
End page 117
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2012-11
ISSN 1328-4207
1742-9552
Keyword(s) adolescent
behaviour
child
parent
personality
Summary Background:  This study investigated the relationship between parental personality patterns and internalising and externalising behaviour problems in a clinically referred sample of children (aged 4–8) and adolescents (aged 12–18).

Methods:  Data from families involved in two clinical trials in Victoria, Australia were analysed (n = 59). Families were administered the Millons Clinical Multiaxial Inventory—III (MCMI-III) which reports personality patterns consistent with Axis II disorder and an Achenbach measure of mental health as appropriate to child's age (Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Youth Self-Report (YSR), or Adult Self-Report (ASR)). Relationships between internalising and externalising behaviour problems, and parental personality patterns were examined via correlation and regression analyses.

Results:  The study found a positive correlation between parental borderline, paranoid, and avoidant personality patterns, and child and adolescent externalising behaviour problems. The relationships were generally stronger for adolescents than for children. However, no relationship was observed between parental personality patterns and internalising behaviour problems.

Conclusions:  These findings underline the importance of clinical assessment of the family ecology as a whole—including the interaction between parental personality patterns and child and adolescent behaviour and emotional problems. These findings contribute to the understanding of developmental risk factors for child and adolescent mental health and the transmission of psychopathology across generations.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, The Australian Psychological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30045723

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Sat, 09 Jun 2012, 13:14:07 EST by Melanie Bertino

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