You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Self-service technology complaint channel choice : exploring consumers' motives

Robertson, Nichola 2012, Self-service technology complaint channel choice : exploring consumers' motives, Managing service quality, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 145-164, doi: 10.1108/09604521211218963.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
robertson-selfservice-2012.pdf Author post print application/pdf 849.46KB 510

Title Self-service technology complaint channel choice : exploring consumers' motives
Author(s) Robertson, Nichola
Journal name Managing service quality
Volume number 22
Issue number 2
Start page 145
End page 164
Total pages 20
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2012
ISSN 0960-4529
Keyword(s) consumer complaints
complaint channel
consumer motivation
media richness theory
qualitative method
self-servicing technology
complaints
self-service
Summary Purpose – This study aims to explore consumers' motives for their choice of complaint channel in the context of self-service technology (SST) failure. Traditional and evolving communication channels are considered.

Design/methodology/approach – Qualitative self-report data from consumers who had recently experienced dissatisfaction with SSTs were collected via an open-ended survey question. Three independent coders used a deductive and inductive iterative process to code the data.

Findings – The findings suggest that both consumer complaint behaviour (CCB) theory and media richness theory (MRT) help to explain consumers' motivation for channel choice. However, consumers' choice appears to be motivated to a greater degree by convenience rather than task-medium fit.

Research limitations/implications – This study was set solely in the SST context and explored consumers' hypothetical complaint channel choice, not actual channel use. Future research could examine the actual performance of complaint channels as perceived by consumers. Consumers' motivation to choose other emerging electronic complaint channels, such as complaint blogs and forums, could also be explored.

Practical implications – Understanding consumers' complaint channel choice is important for organisations to enable them to provide effective and efficient ways for consumers to complain. As complaint channels proliferate, it is difficult for organisations to know which channels to offer.

Originality/value – Choosing an appropriate channel for resolving a complaint is an important consumer decision, which the study of CCB needs to be broadened to include. The current study addresses this gap by, for the first time, integrating CCB theory and MRT. This is valuable because it is common for consumers not to voice their complaints to organisations. To facilitate voiced complaints, organisations need to determine which complaint channels will be most effective and efficient and in which situations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/09604521211218963
Field of Research 150503 Marketing Management (incl Strategy and Customer Relations)
Socio Economic Objective 910403 Marketing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30045826

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 280 Abstract Views, 511 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 13 Jun 2012, 10:01:30 EST by Aysun Alpyurek

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.