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Process and impact evaluation of the romp & chomp obesity prevention intervention in early childhood settings : lessons learned from implementation in preschools and long day care settings

de Silva-Sanigorski, Andrea M., Bell, Andrew C., Kremer, Peter, Park, Janet, Demajo, Lisa, Smith, Michael, Sharp, Sharon, Nichols, Melanie, Carpenter, Lauren, Boak, Rachel and Swinburn, Boyd 2012, Process and impact evaluation of the romp & chomp obesity prevention intervention in early childhood settings : lessons learned from implementation in preschools and long day care settings, Childhood obesity, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 205-215, doi: 10.1089/chi.2011.0118.

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Title Process and impact evaluation of the romp & chomp obesity prevention intervention in early childhood settings : lessons learned from implementation in preschools and long day care settings
Author(s) de Silva-Sanigorski, Andrea M.
Bell, Andrew C.ORCID iD for Bell, Andrew C. orcid.org/0000-0003-2731-9858
Kremer, PeterORCID iD for Kremer, Peter orcid.org/0000-0003-2476-1958
Park, Janet
Demajo, Lisa
Smith, Michael
Sharp, Sharon
Nichols, MelanieORCID iD for Nichols, Melanie orcid.org/0000-0002-7834-5899
Carpenter, Lauren
Boak, Rachel
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Childhood obesity
Volume number 8
Issue number 3
Start page 205
End page 215
Total pages 11
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Place of publication New Rochelle, N.Y.
Publication date 2012-06
ISSN 2153-2168
2153-2176
Keyword(s) childhood obesity
children’s dietary patterns
Summary Background: The Romp & Chomp controlled trial, which aimed to prevent obesity in preschool Australian children, was recently found to reduce the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity and improve children’s dietary patterns. The intervention focused on capacity building and policy implementation within various early childhood settings. This paper reports on the process and impact evaluation of this trial and the lessons learned from this complex community intervention.
Methods: Process data was collected throughout and audits capturing nutrition and physical activity-related environments and practices were completed postintervention by directors of Long Day Care (LDC) centers (n = 10) and preschools (n = 41) in intervention and comparison (n = 161 LDC and n = 347 preschool) groups.
Results: The environmental audits demonstrated positive impacts in both settings on policy, nutrition, physical activity opportunities, and staff capacity and practices, although results varied across settings and were more substantial in the preschool settings. Important lessons were learned in relation to implementation of such community-based interventions, including the significant barriers to implementing health-promotion interventions in early childhood settings, lack of engagement of for-profit LDC centers in the evaluation, and an inability to attribute direct intervention impacts when the intervention components were delivered as part of a health-promotion package integrated with other programs.
Conclusions: These results provide confidence that obesity prevention interventions in children’s settings can be effective; however, significant efforts must be directed toward developing context-specific strategies that invest in policies, capacity building, staff support, and parent engagement. Recognition by funders and reviewers of the difficulties involved in implementing and evaluating such complex interventions is also critical to strengthening the evidence base on the effectiveness of such public health approaches to obesity prevention.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1089/chi.2011.0118
Field of Research 111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30045859

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.