Openly accessible

Enactive research : transversal possibilities for expanding the imaging of science

Keane, Jondi 2012, Enactive research : transversal possibilities for expanding the imaging of science, in Second International Conference on Transdisciplinary Imaging at the Intersections between Art, Science and Culture : Abstract book, Transdisciplinary Imaging Conference, Sydney, N.S.W., pp. 180-191.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
keane-enactiveresearch-abs-2012.pdf Published version application/pdf 41.23KB 10

Title Enactive research : transversal possibilities for expanding the imaging of science
Author(s) Keane, Jondi
Conference name Transdisciplinary Imaging at the Intersections between Art, Science and Culture. Conference (2nd : 2012 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 22-23 Jun. 2012
Title of proceedings Second International Conference on Transdisciplinary Imaging at the Intersections between Art, Science and Culture : Abstract book
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2012
Conference series Transdisciplinary Imaging at the Intersections between Art, Science and Culture Conference
Start page 180
End page 191
Total pages 12
Publisher Transdisciplinary Imaging Conference
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Keyword(s) transdisciplinarity
enaction
diagram
biogram
biotopology
embodiment
Summary This paper explores the notion of the expanded image as a transdisciplinary interaction between people and environments. In support of this proposition, images and imaging will be discussed through a series of transformative steps: from the diagram to the biogram and from the biogram to biotopology. Two research projects, exemplary of a transdisciplinary approach, inform the move to biotopology (the continuous surface of interactions tied to imaging practices): first, theories of enaction in cognitive science foreground co-selective processes and the precariousness of self- organizing systems and supply new ways of imaging body-environment relationships (Stewart et al 2010; Thompson 2007; and Varela et al 1993); and second, the procedural architecture of artist- turned-architects Arakawa and Gins foregrounds the reconfigurability of the co-selective process that becomes an enactive practice. These approaches suggest that if the image were expanded to include the intersection of the human organism’s behaviors, artifacts (such as images) and built- environments, then the ‘person’ whose myriad surfaces flicker towards future action, might become the best description of an expanded form of imaging, always in process and flickering towards future action. The many and non-locatable surfaces of person would defy disciplinary boundaries and interfere with habitual patterns of imaging. Ultimately, the aim of expanding imaging practices is to expand an embodied capacity to configure and reconfigure conceptual and material realms.
ISBN 9780980718683
Language eng
Field of Research 199999 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2012, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30045934

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 92 Abstract Views, 12 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 22 Jun 2012, 13:30:48 EST by Caroline Victoria Stok

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.