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A conversation analysis of the Iranian youths' written chats of English

Shokouhi, Hossein and Hamidi, Neda 2010, A conversation analysis of the Iranian youths' written chats of English, Iranian journal of applied linguistics, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 149-177.

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Title A conversation analysis of the Iranian youths' written chats of English
Author(s) Shokouhi, Hossein
Hamidi, Neda
Journal name Iranian journal of applied linguistics
Volume number 13
Issue number 1
Start page 149
End page 177
Total pages 29
Publisher Research Institute of Foreign Languages, Teacher Training University
Place of publication Tehran, Iran
Publication date 2010-03
ISSN 1735-1634
Keyword(s) computer-mediated-communication (CMC)
conversation analysis
internet
chat
humor
Summary The ever-increasing application of computer and internet mandates a longer domain for computer-mediated-communication (CMC). Internet chat as a principal feature of CMC has attracted tremendous attention among the youths in recent years. Thus, this study has focused on the written chats of 100 Iranian university students majoring in different disciplines. We analyzed 400 chat samples (composed of 4000 moves) in terms of opening and continuing speech functions based on Eggins and Slade’s (1997) model of casual conversation. We also examined humor and paralinguistic features based on taxonomies of Huffaker and Calvert (2005) and Nastri, Pen a, and Hancock (2006). Among the various types of speech functions, nine opening speech functions, seven continuing speech functions and four humor and paralinguistic features were investigated. The analysis of the data shows that the salient opening speech function has been‘ statement: opinion’ which provides attitudinal and evaluative information. Additionally, the outstanding types of continuing speech functions are ‘prolong: extend’, ‘prolong: enhance’, and ‘append: elaborate’. Therefore, it is in order for the participants to offer additional or contrasting information to the previous move or qualify it by giving details of time, place, condition, etc. Moreover, in case of interruption by the other chatter, the participants mostly tend to clarify, exemplify or reiterate the previous move. Furthermore, the participants produced irony, as a humorous element, in a great volume which is indicative of their tendency toward being indirect during conversation. The subjects also used many paralinguistic features such as misspellings and repeated punctuations in order to express their emotions and attract their partners’ attention in the absence of verbal communication.
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Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Research Institute of Foreign Languages, Teacher Training University
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30045970

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.