You are not logged in.

The relationship between investigative interviewing experience and open-ended question usage

Powell, Martine B., Hughes-Scholes, Carolyn H., Smith, Rebecca and Sharman, Stefanie J. 2014, The relationship between investigative interviewing experience and open-ended question usage, Police practice and research : an international journal, vol. 15, no. 4, Special Issue: Contemporary Approaches to Policing Research in Australia, pp. 283-292, doi: 10.1080/15614263.2012.704170.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The relationship between investigative interviewing experience and open-ended question usage
Author(s) Powell, Martine B.
Hughes-Scholes, Carolyn H.
Smith, Rebecca
Sharman, Stefanie J.
Journal name Police practice and research : an international journal
Volume number 15
Issue number 4
Season Special Issue: Contemporary Approaches to Policing Research in Australia
Start page 283
End page 292
Total pages 10
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1561-4263
1477-271X
Keyword(s) investigative interviewing
child abuse investigation
police interviewing
Summary We present three studies examining the role of prior job experience in interviewing and interviewers’ ability to learn open-ended questions during a training program. We predicted a negative relationship such that more experienced interviewers would perform worse after training than less experienced interviewers, and that (irrespective of baseline performance) the more experienced interviewers would improve the least during training. These predictions were made for two reasons. First, specific questions are commonly used in the workplace (i.e. open-ended questioning constitutes new learning). Second, experience in the use of specific questions potentially interferes with newly learned open-ended questions. Overall, our predictions were supported across different participant samples (including police officers specialized in child abuse investigation and social workers from the child protection area), time delays, and modes of training. The results highlight the need for investment in ongoing investigative interviewing training commencing early during professionals’ careers, prior to the establishment of long-term habits in the use of specific questions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/15614263.2012.704170
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Taylor & Francis
Free to Read? No
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046110

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 277 Abstract Views, 32 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 12 Jul 2012, 11:55:33 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.