Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased risk of the development of the metabolic syndrome at five years : results from a national, population-based prospective study (the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study : AusDiab)

Gagnon, Claudia, Lu, Zhong X., Magliano, Dianna J., Dunstan, David W., Shaw, Jonathan E., Zimmet, Paul Z., Sikaris, Ken, Ebeling, Peter R. and Daly, Robin M. 2012, Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased risk of the development of the metabolic syndrome at five years : results from a national, population-based prospective study (the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study : AusDiab), Journal of clinical endocrinology, vol. 97, no. 6, pp. 1953-1961.

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Title Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased risk of the development of the metabolic syndrome at five years : results from a national, population-based prospective study (the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study : AusDiab)
Author(s) Gagnon, Claudia
Lu, Zhong X.
Magliano, Dianna J.
Dunstan, David W.
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Zimmet, Paul Z.
Sikaris, Ken
Ebeling, Peter R.
Daly, Robin M.
Journal name Journal of clinical endocrinology
Volume number 97
Issue number 6
Start page 1953
End page 1961
Total pages 9
Publisher The Endocrine Society
Place of publication Chevy Chase, Md.
Publication date 2012-06
ISSN 0021-972X
1945-7197
Keyword(s) 25 hydroxyvitamin D
glucose
high density lipoprotein cholesterol
triacylglycerol
blood pressure measurement
body mass
cholesterol blood level
cohort analysis
controlled study
Summary Context: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration has been inversely associated with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the relationship between 25(OH)D and incident MetS remains unclear.

Objective: We evaluated the prospective association between 25(OH)D, MetS, and its components in a large population-based cohort of adults aged 25 yr or older.

Design: We used baseline (1999–2000) and 5-yr follow-up data of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab).

Participants: Of the 11,247 adults evaluated at baseline, 6,537 returned for follow-up. We studied those without MetS at baseline and with complete data (n = 4164; mean age 50 yr; 58% women; 92% Europids).

Outcome Measures: We report the associations between baseline 25(OH)D and 5-yr MetS incidence and its components, adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, season, latitude, smoking, family history of type 2 diabetes, physical activity, education, kidney function, waist circumference (WC), and baseline MetS components.

Results: A total of 528 incident cases (12.7%) of MetS developed over 5 yr. Compared with those in the highest quintile of 25(OH)D (≥34 ng/ml), MetS risk was significantly higher in people with 25(OH)D in the first (<18 ng/ml) and second (18–23 ng/ml) quintiles; odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 1.41 (1.02–1.95) and 1.74 (1.28–2.37), respectively. Serum 25(OH)D was inversely associated with 5-yr WC (P < 0.001), triglycerides (P < 0.01), fasting glucose (P < 0.01), and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (P < 0.001) but not with 2-h plasma glucose (P = 0.29), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.70), or blood pressure (P = 0.46).

Conclusions: In Australian adults, lower 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with increased MetS risk and higher WC, serum triglyceride, fasting glucose, and insulin resistance at 5 yr. Vitamin D supplementation studies are required to establish whether the link between vitamin D deficiency and MetS is causal.
Language eng
Field of Research 110306 Endocrinology
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, The Endocrine Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046128

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Created: Tue, 17 Jul 2012, 10:45:41 EST by Jane Moschetti

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