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Invasive plants – Do they devastate or diversify rural livelihoods? Rural farmers' perception of three invasive plants in Nepal

Rai, Rajesh Kumar, Scarborough, Helen, Subedi, Naresh and Lamichhane, Baburam 2012, Invasive plants – Do they devastate or diversify rural livelihoods? Rural farmers' perception of three invasive plants in Nepal, Journal for nature conservation, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 170-176, doi: 10.1016/j.jnc.2012.01.003.

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Title Invasive plants – Do they devastate or diversify rural livelihoods? Rural farmers' perception of three invasive plants in Nepal
Author(s) Rai, Rajesh Kumar
Scarborough, HelenORCID iD for Scarborough, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-0562-1987
Subedi, Naresh
Lamichhane, Baburam
Journal name Journal for nature conservation
Volume number 20
Issue number 3
Start page 170
End page 176
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2012-06
ISSN 1617-1381
Keyword(s) invasive plants
rural livelihoods
Mikania micrantha
Lantana camara
Chromolaena odorata
Summary In this paper, we examine how rural people in the buffer zone of Chitwan National Park in Nepal perceive the effects of accidently transported invasive plant species, such as Mikania micrantha, Lantana camara and Chromolaena odorata, on their livelihoods. We found that their perception of the impact of each species on their livelihood varies with factors such as the duration of the presence of invasive plants in the landscape, and household characteristics. Results of a household survey indicate that farm households close to the forests have responded to the invasive species both as a victim and a beneficiary. Farm households are likely to adapt to the invaded environment as they have a history of interacting with invasive plants and can commoditise them through appropriate intervention. Additionally, the findings indicate that rural people are willing to invest in the control and management of invasive plants if appropriate technical assistance is available. Without assistance, they consider mitigating the infestation an unattainable mission and consider acceptance of the invasive species as a part of the rural ecosystem an inevitable outcome.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jnc.2012.01.003
Field of Research 140205 Environment and Resource Economics
Socio Economic Objective 960404 Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Forest and Woodlands Environments
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Elsevier GmbH
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046172

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
School of Accounting, Economics and Finance
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Created: Thu, 19 Jul 2012, 14:39:51 EST by Aysun Alpyurek

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