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The availability of snack food displays that may trigger impulse purchases in Melbourne supermarkets

Thornton, Lukar E., Cameron, Adrian J., McNaughton, Sarah A., Worsley, Anthony and Crawford, David A. 2012, The availability of snack food displays that may trigger impulse purchases in Melbourne supermarkets, BMC public health, vol. 12, no. 1, Article number 194, pp. 1-8.

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Title The availability of snack food displays that may trigger impulse purchases in Melbourne supermarkets
Author(s) Thornton, Lukar E.
Cameron, Adrian J.
McNaughton, Sarah A.
Worsley, Anthony
Crawford, David A.
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 12
Issue number 1
Season Article number 194
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Food environment
Area-level disadvantage
Supermarkets
Snack food
Summary Background

Supermarkets play a major role in influencing the food purchasing behaviours of most households. Snack food exposures within these stores may contribute to higher levels of consumption and ultimately to increasing levels of obesity, particularly within socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. We aimed to examine the availability of snack food displays at checkouts, end-of-aisle displays and island displays in major supermarket chains in the least and most socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods of Melbourne.
Methods

Within-store audits of 35 Melbourne supermarkets. Supermarkets were sampled from the least and most socioeconomically disadvantaged suburbs within 30 km of the Melbourne CBD. We measured the availability of crisps, chocolate, confectionery, and soft drinks (diet and regular) at the checkouts, in end-of-aisle displays, and in island bin displays.
Results

Snack food displays were most prominent at checkouts with only five stores not having snack foods at 100% of their checkouts. Snack foods were also present at a number of end-of-aisle displays (at both the front (median 38%) and back (median 33%) of store), and in island bin displays (median number of island displays: 7; median total circumference of island displays: 19.4 metres). Chocolate items were the most common snack food item on display. There was no difference in the availability of these snack food displays by neighbourhood disadvantage.
Conclusions

As a result of the high availability of snack food displays, exposure to snack foods is almost unavoidable in Melbourne supermarkets, regardless of levels of neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Results of this study could promote awareness of the prominence of unhealthy food items in chain-brand supermarkets outlets.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Thornton et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046198

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.