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Resilience to obesity among socioeconomically disadvantaged women : the READI study

Ball, K., Abbott, G., Cleland, V., Timperio, A, Thornton, L., Mishra, G., Jeffery, R. W., Brug, J., King, A. and Crawford, D. 2012, Resilience to obesity among socioeconomically disadvantaged women : the READI study, International journal of obesity, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 855-865.

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Title Resilience to obesity among socioeconomically disadvantaged women : the READI study
Author(s) Ball, K.
Abbott, G.
Cleland, V.
Timperio, A
Thornton, L.
Mishra, G.
Jeffery, R. W.
Brug, J.
King, A.
Crawford, D.
Journal name International journal of obesity
Volume number 36
Issue number 6
Start page 855
End page 865
Total pages 11
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2012-06
ISSN 0307-0565
Keyword(s) obesity risk factors
structural equation models
socioeconomic disadvantage
Summary Objective:


This cross-sectional study aimed to identify sociodemographic and behavioural characteristics of ‘overweight-resilient’ women, that is, women who were in a healthy body weight range, despite living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods that place them at increased risk of obesity. The study also aimed to test a comprehensive theoretically derived model of the associations between intrapersonal, social and environmental factors and obesity among this target group.
Participants:


A total of 3235 women aged 18–45 years from 80 urban and rural neighbourhoods throughout Victoria, Australia, participated in the Resilience for Eating and Activity Despite Inequality study.
Measurements:


Women reported height, weight, sociodemographic characteristics, leisure-time physical activity, dietary behaviours and a range of theoretically derived cognitive, social and neighbourhood environmental characteristics hypothesized to influence obesity risk. A theoretical model predicting body mass index (BMI) was tested using structural equation models.
Results:


Women classified as ‘resilient’ to obesity tended to be younger, born overseas, more highly educated, unmarried and to have higher or undisclosed household incomes. They engaged in more leisure-time physical activity and consumed less fast foods and soft drinks than overweight/obese women. Neighbourhood characteristics, social characteristics and cognitive characteristics all contributed to explaining variation in BMI in the hypothesized directions.
Conclusions:


These results demonstrate several characteristics of women appearing ‘resilient’ to obesity, despite their increased risk conferred by residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Acknowledging the cross-sectional study design, the results advance theoretical frameworks aimed at investigating obesity risk by providing evidence in support of a comprehensive model of direct and indirect effects on obesity of neighbourhood, as well as social, cognitive and behavioural characteristics.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046266

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.