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Socioeconomic variation in diet and activity-related behaviours of Australian children and adolescents aged 2–16 years

Cameron, A. J., Ball, K., Pearson, N., Lioret, S., Crawford, D. A., Campbell, K., Hesketh, K. and McNaughton, S. A. 2012, Socioeconomic variation in diet and activity-related behaviours of Australian children and adolescents aged 2–16 years, Pediatric obesity, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 329-342.

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Title Socioeconomic variation in diet and activity-related behaviours of Australian children and adolescents aged 2–16 years
Author(s) Cameron, A. J.
Ball, K.
Pearson, N.
Lioret, S.
Crawford, D. A.
Campbell, K.
Hesketh, K.
McNaughton, S. A.
Journal name Pediatric obesity
Volume number 7
Issue number 4
Start page 329
End page 342
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2012-08
ISSN 2047-6302
2047-6310
Keyword(s) children
socioeconomic
physical activity
diet
Summary Background

Evidence for age-related variation in the relationship between obesity-related behaviours and socioeconomic position may assist in the targeting of dietary and physical activity interventions among children.
Objective

To investigate the relationship between different indicators of socioeconomic position and obesity-related behaviours across childhood and adolescence.
Methods

Data were from 4487 children aged 2 to 16 years participating in the cross-sectional 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Socioeconomic position was defined by the highest education of the primary or secondary carer and parental income. Activity was assessed using recall methods with physical activity also assessed using pedometers. Intake of energy-dense drinks and snack foods, fruits and vegetables was assessed using 2 × 24-h dietary recalls.
Results

A socioeconomic gradient was evident for each dietary measure (although in age-specific analyses, not for energy-dense snacks in older children), as well as television viewing, but not physical activity. Whether each behaviour was most strongly related to parental income or education of the primary or secondary carer was age and sex dependent. The socioeconomic gradient was strongest for television viewing time and consumption of fruit and energy-dense drinks.
Conclusions

A strong socioeconomic gradient in eating behaviours and television viewing time was observed. Relationships for particular behaviours differed by age, sex and how socioeconomic position was defined. Socioeconomic indicators define different population groups and represent different components of socioeconomic position. These findings may provide insights into who should be targeted in preventive health efforts at different life stages.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046267

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.