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Using e-learning to increase the preparedness and confidence of nurses to perform buttonhole cannulation

Sinclair, Peter M., Blackman, Ian, Schoch, Monica and Black, Kirsten 2010, Using e-learning to increase the preparedness and confidence of nurses to perform buttonhole cannulation, in EDTNA/ERCA 2010 : 39th EDTNA/ERCA International Conference Abstract Booklet : Moving forward together Education and Innovation in Renal Care, EDTNA/ERCA, Prague, Czech Republic, pp. 69-69.

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Title Using e-learning to increase the preparedness and confidence of nurses to perform buttonhole cannulation
Author(s) Sinclair, Peter M.
Blackman, Ian
Schoch, MonicaORCID iD for Schoch, Monica orcid.org/0000-0002-0550-7578
Black, Kirsten
Conference name European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association International Conference (39th : 2010 : Dublin, Ireland)
Conference location Dublin, Ireland
Conference dates 18-21 Sept. 2010
Title of proceedings EDTNA/ERCA 2010 : 39th EDTNA/ERCA International Conference Abstract Booklet : Moving forward together Education and Innovation in Renal Care
Editor(s) [Ashwanden, Cordelia]
Publication date 2010
Conference series European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association International Conference
Start page 69
End page 69
Total pages 1
Publisher EDTNA/ERCA
Place of publication Prague, Czech Republic
Keyword(s) e-learning
buttonhole cannulation
Summary Arteriovenous fistulae are considered the gold standard for haemodialysis vascular access. Their use can be fraught with complications for both the patient and cannulator, with knowledge, expertise and skills being key factors in reducing access associated morbidity. There is mounting evidence demonstrating the efficacy of the buttonhole technique. One disturbing problem noted with the buttonhole experience has been an increased rate in site infections, anecdotally attributed to poor buttonhole site preparation. Enhanced knowledge and skills for nurses are crucial in increasing patient comfort and improving outcomes.

Although knowledge and skill acquisition related to vascular access are often the focus of individual institutional educational initiatives, a national evidence based program that provides free equitable access to all nurses does not exist in Australasia. A survey of Australasian Nephrology Educators’ identified the need for more effective and consistent delivery of clinical education for nurses using innovative, web‐based approaches that support the tenets of e-learning methodologies. This paper will discuss the development and implementation of an e-learning program for buttonhole cannulation. The preparedness of participants to professionally engage with buttonhole cannulation and their self-efficacy (estimates) in undertaking learning about the clinical procedure using e-learning will be evaluated. In addition it will highlight the benefits of inter‐organizational partnerships and how they can facilitate positive change in teaching and learning practices aimed at improving patient outcomes. This project has unique characteristics that collectively provide value, distinction and innovation to patients, nurses, and renal departments across Australasia. As the e-learning program is founded on evidence based practice this project is easily transferable to an international context.

Notes Winner of 'Certificate of Merit' for 3rd place in Poster section.
ISBN 9788025478929
Language eng
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
130306 Educational Technology and Computing
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category E3.1 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2012, EDTNA/ERCA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046333

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Created: Tue, 31 Jul 2012, 09:46:41 EST by Monica Schoch

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