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Utility-based quality of life associated with overweight and obesity : the Australian diabetes, obesity, and lifestyle study

Keating, Catherine L., Peeters, Anna, Swinburn, Boyd A., Magliano, Dianna J. and Moodie, Marjory L. 2013, Utility-based quality of life associated with overweight and obesity : the Australian diabetes, obesity, and lifestyle study, Obesity, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 652-655, doi: 10.1002/oby.20290.

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Title Utility-based quality of life associated with overweight and obesity : the Australian diabetes, obesity, and lifestyle study
Author(s) Keating, Catherine L.
Peeters, Anna
Swinburn, Boyd A.
Magliano, Dianna J.
Moodie, Marjory L.ORCID iD for Moodie, Marjory L. orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Journal name Obesity
Volume number 21
Issue number 3
Start page 652
End page 655
Total pages 4
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication Hoboken, N.J.
Publication date 2013-03
ISSN 1930-7381
Keyword(s) obesity
Quality of Life
Summary This study aimed to estimate utility-based quality of life (UQoL) differences between healthy body weight and excess body weight categories. Cross-sectional analysis of 10,959 adults, participating in baseline data collection of the nationally representative Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle (AusDiab) Study was undertaken. Height and weight were measured by trained personnel. Body weight categories were assigned as healthy weight, overweight, and obesity subclasses I, II and III. UQoL was assessed using the SF-6D, which captures physical functioning, role limitation, social functioning, pain, mental health, and vitality on a score of 0.00–1.00 (worst-best). The relationship between body weight categories and UQoL was assessed using linear regression, adjusting for age, sex, education, and smoking. Relative to the healthy weight group (mean UQoL score 0.77), mean adjusted UQoL differences (95% confidence intervals) were 0.001 (−0.008, 0.010) for overweight, −0.012 (−0.022, −0.001) for class-I obese, −0.020 (−0.041, 0.001) for class-II obese, and −0.069 (−0.099, −0.039) for class-III obese groups. Adding metabolic syndrome markers to the covariates had little impact on these differences. Results confirmed an inverse dose–response relationship between body weight and UQoL in this study of Australian adults. This highlights the need to incorporate UQoL measures which are sensitive to the subclasses of obesity when evaluating obesity interventions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/oby.20290
Field of Research 140208 Health Economics
Socio Economic Objective 920204 Evaluation of Health Outcomes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Nature Publishing Group
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046549

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.