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En-gendering the nation : gender-bending and nationalism in Miles Franklin's 'My brilliant career' and Emily Lawless's 'Grania: The story of an Island'

Devlin-Glass, Frances 2011, En-gendering the nation : gender-bending and nationalism in Miles Franklin's 'My brilliant career' and Emily Lawless's 'Grania: The story of an Island', Australasian journal of Irish studies, vol. 11, 2008-2009, pp. 73-85.

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Title En-gendering the nation : gender-bending and nationalism in Miles Franklin's 'My brilliant career' and Emily Lawless's 'Grania: The story of an Island'
Author(s) Devlin-Glass, Frances
Journal name Australasian journal of Irish studies
Volume number 11
Season 2008-2009
Start page 73
End page 85
Total pages 13
Publisher Irish Studies Association of Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1837-1094
Summary Writing in the lee of first-wave feminism and in an era of nation-invention, the Irish Ascendancy novelist, Emily Lawless, and the aggressively Australian Miles Franklin (of Irish, English and German extraction and coming from families who were pastoralists) wrote novels of adolescence, respectively, 'Grania: the Story of an Island' (1892) and 'My Brilliant Career' (1901). Similar and different in many ways, they both wrote as women and self-consciously inserted themselves into nation-inscribing projects with an eye to overseas readerships, and they played fast and loose with class. Curiously, both contributed to the process of transforming 'nowhere-places' into iconic nationalist places: Franklin put the Monaro on the map (a region that was a nationalist icon before the 'Red Centre' usurped its place); and Lawless wrote in ethnographic ways about the Aran Islands more than a decade before J.M. Synge tramped westward in search of the 'Peasant Quality', so beloved of the Abbey Theatre playwrights and audiences. Most compellingly, they wrote of the near-pathologies of masculinities within nationalist agendas, and of marriage and sexuality. This article examines the novels comparatively and contrastively and asks uncomfortable questions about why and how their interventions were untimely.
Language eng
Field of Research 200503 British and Irish Literature
Socio Economic Objective 950203 Languages and Literature
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Irish Studies Association of Australia and New Zealand
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046580

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Communication and Creative Arts
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