Adjuvant therapy, not mammographic screening, accounts for most of the observed breast cancer specific mortality reductions in Australian women since the national screening program began in 1991

Burton, Robert C., Bell, Robin J., Thiagarajah, Geetha and Stevenson, Christopher 2012, Adjuvant therapy, not mammographic screening, accounts for most of the observed breast cancer specific mortality reductions in Australian women since the national screening program began in 1991, Breast cancer research and treatment, vol. 131, no. 3, pp. 949-955.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Adjuvant therapy, not mammographic screening, accounts for most of the observed breast cancer specific mortality reductions in Australian women since the national screening program began in 1991
Author(s) Burton, Robert C.
Bell, Robin J.
Thiagarajah, Geetha
Stevenson, Christopher
Journal name Breast cancer research and treatment
Volume number 131
Issue number 3
Start page 949
End page 955
Total pages 7
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2012-02
ISSN 0167-6806
1573-7217
Keyword(s) breast
cancer
mammographic
adjuvant
therapy
Summary There has been a 28% reduction in age-standardised breast cancer mortality in Australia since 1991 when the free national mammographic program (BreastScreen) began. Therefore, a comparative study between BreastScreen participation and breast cancer age specific mortality trends in Australia was undertaken for two time periods between 1991 and 2007, where women aged 50–59 and 60–69 years, who were invited to screen, were compared to women aged 40–49 and 70–79 years who were not invited, but who did have access to the program. There were mortality reductions in all four age groups between 1991–1992 and 2007, resulting in 5,849 (95% CI 4,979 to 6,718) fewer women dying of breast cancer than would have otherwise been the case. Women aged 40–49 years, who had the lowest BreastScreen participation (approximately 20%), had the largest mortality reduction: 44% (95% CI 34.8–51.2). Women aged 60–69 years, who had the highest BreastScreen participation (approximately 60%), had the smallest mortality reduction: 19% (95% CI 10.5–26.9). As BreastScreen participation by invited women aged 50–69 years only reached a maximum of about 55–60% in 1998–1999, a decline in mortality in Australian women cannot be attributed to BreastScreen prior to this time. Thus, almost 60% of the Australian decline in breast cancer mortality since 1991 cannot be attributed to BreastScreen. Therefore, mammographic screening cannot account for most of the reductions in breast cancer mortality that have occurred in Australian women since 1991 and may have contributed to over-diagnosis. Most, if not all, of the reductions can be attributed to the adjuvant hormonal and chemotherapy, which Australian women have increasingly received since 1986.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046750

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 29 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 09 Aug 2012, 14:54:49 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.