Area-level socioeconomic status and incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism : the Australian diabetes, obesity and lifestyle (AusDiab) study

Williams, Emily D., Magliano, Dianna J., Zimmet, Paul Z., Kavanagh, Anne M., Stevenson, Christopher E., Oldenburg, Brian F. and Shaw, Jonathan E. 2012, Area-level socioeconomic status and incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism : the Australian diabetes, obesity and lifestyle (AusDiab) study, Diabetes care, vol. 35, no. 7, pp. 1455-1461.

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Title Area-level socioeconomic status and incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism : the Australian diabetes, obesity and lifestyle (AusDiab) study
Author(s) Williams, Emily D.
Magliano, Dianna J.
Zimmet, Paul Z.
Kavanagh, Anne M.
Stevenson, Christopher E.
Oldenburg, Brian F.
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Journal name Diabetes care
Volume number 35
Issue number 7
Start page 1455
End page 1461
Total pages 7
Publisher American Diabetes Association
Place of publication Alexandria, Va.
Publication date 2012-07
ISSN 0149-5992
1935-5548
Keyword(s) blood glucose
diabetes mellitus
type 2
glucose tolerance test
incidence
life style
longitudinal studies
obesity
risk factors
social class
Summary OBJECTIVE--To examine the role of area-level socioeconomic status (SES) on the development of abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) using national, population-based data.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS--The Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study is a national, population-based, longitudinal study of adults aged [greater than or equal to] 25 years. A sample of 4,572 people provided complete baseline (1999 to 2000) and 5-year follow-up (2004 to 2005) data relevant for these analyses. Incident AGM was assessed using fasting plasma glucose and 2-h plasma glucose from oral glucose tolerance tests, and demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data were collected by interview and questionnaire. Area SES was defined using the Index of Relative Socioeconomic Disadvantage. Generalized linear mixed models were used to examine the relationship between area SES and incident AGM, with adjustment for covariates and correction for cluster design effects.

RESULTS--Area SES predicted the development of AGM, after adjustment for age, sex, and individual SES. People living in areas with the most disadvantage were significantly more likely to develop AGM, compared with those living in the least deprived areas (odds ratio 1.53; 95% CI 1.07-2.18). Health behaviors (in particular, physical activity) and central adiposity appeared to partially mediate this relationship.

CONCLUSIONS--Our findings suggest that characteristics of the physical, social, and economic aspects of local areas influence diabetes risk. Future research should focus on identifying the aspects of local environment that are associated with diabetes risk and how they might be modified.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046753

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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