Comparing trends in BMI and waist circumference

Walls, Helen L., Stevenson, Christopher E., Mannan, Haider R., Abdullah, Asnawi, Reid, Christopher M., McNeil, John J. and Peeters, Anna 2011, Comparing trends in BMI and waist circumference, Obesity, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 216-219.

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Title Comparing trends in BMI and waist circumference
Author(s) Walls, Helen L.
Stevenson, Christopher E.
Mannan, Haider R.
Abdullah, Asnawi
Reid, Christopher M.
McNeil, John J.
Peeters, Anna
Journal name Obesity
Volume number 19
Issue number 1
Start page 216
End page 219
Total pages 4
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Hoboken, N. J.
Publication date 2011-01
ISSN 1930-7381
1930-739X
Keyword(s) body mass index
body weights and measures
cross-sectional studies
diagnostic techniques
Summary The nature of excess body weight may be changing over time to one of greater central adiposity. The aim of this study is to determine whether BMI and waist circumference (WC) are increasing proportionately among population subgroups and the range of bodyweight, and to examine the public health implications of the findings. Our data are from two cross-sectional surveys (the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Studies (NHANES) in 1988–1994 (NHANES III) and 2005–2006), from which we have used samples of 15,349 and 4,176 participants aged ≥20 years. Between 1988–1994 and 2005–2006 BMI increased by an average of 1.8 kg/m2 and WC by 4.7 cm (adjusted for sex, age, race-ethnicity, and education). The increase in WC was more than could be attributed simply to increases in BMI. This independent increase in WC (of on average, 0.9 cm) was consistent across the different BMI categories, sexes, education levels, and race-ethnicity groups. It occurred in younger but not older age groups. Overall in each BMI category, the prevalence of low-risk WC decreased and the prevalence of increased-risk or substantially increased-risk WC increased. These results suggest that the adverse health consequences associated with obesity may be increasingly underestimated by trends in BMI alone. Since WC is closely linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, it is important to know the prevailing trends in both of these parameters.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30046764

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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